Urgent Care Clinic West Valley City Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

WEST VALLEY CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Urgent Care Clinic West Valley City Utah

Some medical situations require more than a bandage and home remedies. Our West Valley City, Utah urgent care clinic offers a nice balance between emergency room situations and a trip to the doctor’s office. Examples of some of the situations we treat include vomiting, sprains, eye infections, potentially broken or fractured bones and fevers. We’re also well-prepared for such emergency situations as seizures, chest pains, unstoppable bleeding and extreme abdominal pain.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Upper Respiratory Infections, Cold Treatment, Health Center, Flu Treatment
Urgent Care Clinic West Valley City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic West Valley City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84119 84120 84128 and Family Doctor in 84119 84120 84128 and
Medical Care in 84119 84120 84128

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What to expect from an urgent care clinic when you're suffering from an accident injury

An urgent care clinic is a specific form of medical facility, where you can find a range of medical services for illness and accident injury. However, not everyone is familiar with them, and don’t know what to expect, or how to decide whether to seek medical attention from their regular doctor, the emergency room or the urgent care clinic for an accident injury.

If you have an illness or accident injury, here is what you can expect to find at your urgent care clinic.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care clinics are intended for an illness or accident injury that is not life-threatening, but cannot wait overnight or until a primary care doctor is available. For example, strep throat or ear infections, dehydration, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, skin infections, allergic reactions to medication and non life-threating injuries.

The American Association of Urgent Care Medicine defines urgent care as “the provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and accident injury.” The AAUCM explains that urgent care does not replace either the emergency room, nor your primary care giver — your family doctor. The urgent care clinic is useful outside of regular office hours, or when your primary caregiver is away from their clinic.

How to choose the right type of care

It makes no sense to use a baseball bat to swat a fly. Treatment at a hospital’s emergency room (ER) can be very expensive, so they’re best reserved for truly life-threatening emergencies.

Choose the emergency room for severe situations:

  • compound fractures, especially where bone is exposed
  • convulsions or seizures
  • gunshot wounds or deep knife wounds
  • uncontrollable bleeding
  • moderate to severe (second to third-degree) burns
  • poisoning
  • severe abdominal pain
  • signs of heart attack or stroke
  • serious head, back or neck injuries
  • problems related to pregnancy

Is urgent care right for your accident injury?

These are for a medical issue that may not be an accident injury, but still needs treatment in less than 24 hours. Some examples include:

  • falls
  • cuts that require stitches to stop bleeding
  • mild to moderate asthma or other breathing problems
  • eye infections or irritation
  • flu or fever
  • severe sore throat or cough
  • skin rashes and infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration

What you can expect

No appointment is necessary — just walk in and explain your problem to the receptionist, and you’ll be assessed quickly for appropriate medical attention.

You can also expect to fill in a number of forms, so that the urgent care clinic staff have the information they need to assess and treat you appropriately. You’ll be asked questions about your current health issue, when it began, what it affects and how severe it is.

You’ll also be asked about your medical history — infections, long-term conditions, childhood illnesses and injuries, allergies and so on. This is critical to ensure you don’t get prescribed a medication you’re allergic to, or that may cause unforeseen side effects. You can also expect lower costs than in any emergency room.

What to bring

Preparing for your visit to the urgent care clinic can speed your assessment and reduce your stress. Before you leave, make sure you have:
  • a list of all medications you are currently taking
  • a list of medications that you need but don’t have
  • notes about symptoms and changes in your condition
  • a list of doctors and medical facilities you have been to before, including your primary care doctor or family doctor
  • a family member or trusted friend
  • questions to ask
  • health insurance form or card.

Before you leave

Ask the treating physician or the receptionist about any medication or treatment prescribed. Make sure you, or the person who came with you, understands how to take them.

Ask about any needed follow-up visits, treatments or tests. Make sure you get the place, date and time in writing.

Ask about referrals and information sent to your primary care doctor or specialists.

Knowledge is health

Different medical issues require the right approach. Learn when to choose between the emergency room and the urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah can make all the difference to your health.
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Questions your family doctor should ask you

Staying healthy depends on honest, open communication with your family doctor. When looking for a physician who will look after the health of you and your family, you need to find someone you trust. Your family doctor needs a complete, accurate picture of your health status.

The first step is to gather information from you about your current health, and your health history. When you're choosing a family doctor, look for one who asks you at least these questions:

What medications do you take?

To make the right decisions, your family doctor needs to assess all the medications you’re taking. This includes not only prescription drugs, but also all over-ther-counter, herbal and organic remedies you may be using. Often, they can have negative effects when used together. Herbal remedies can also interfere with prescription medications. For instance, St. John’s Wort may interfere with antidepressants. Ginseng should not be used by people on blood thinners like warfarin.

Your family doctor should ask you about all the medications, prescription and otherwise, that you use regularly.

What medications have you stopped taking?

For many, medications are costly. Too many people stop taking prescription medications, or reduce the amount they take, simply because of the cost. Your family doctor should ask you whether you’re taking the medications they’ve prescribed, whether you’re taking the amount prescribed or cutting them in half, like many people do. Tell your family doctor if you’re having any trouble paying for them. They may have a solution.

How much do you drink and smoke? No, really.

Many of us are reluctant to admit how much alcohol, tobacco or other recreational susbstances we consume. There’s just too much social pressure.

But your physician needs to know this to make the right decisions about your health and anything they prescribe for you. Don’t worry — admitting to your family doctor that you use cannabis will not lead to your arrest. Doctors are bound to respect confidentiality. But any substance can have an effect on a prescription medication, so they need to know in order to make the right decisions for your health.

Do you use herbal or organic treatments?

Herbal supplements, vitamins and over-the-counter medications can interact with prescription drugs. For example, weight loss supplements can put excess stress on your heart. Tell your family physician if you’re using any of these so they don’t prescribe a medication that injures your health.

What is your health history?

To make good decisions about your health needs, your family doctor needs to know your complete medical history. This includes serious illnesses and injuries you had when you were young, even if it was a long time ago.

They also need to know about your family history. Diabetes, cancer and heart disease often have a hereditary factor. Knowing that your family has a tendency toward some kind of health issue can help your family doctor make recommendations for prevention.

Do you notice blood in your stool?

The doctor’s office is the place to drop your embarrassment. No one wants to talk about poop, but blood in your stool can be a major warning sign for serious health issues, including cancer. The key is catching it early. Don’t be too embarrassed to tell your family doctor about it.

Also tell your doctor about any changes in your bathroom habits —such as, you’re constipated after years of clock-like regularity.

How often do you exercise — really?

Physical activity is vital to your physical and mental health. While we all want to tell people we work out three days a week, your doctor needs an accurate picture to make the right assessments for your health.

Are you under stress?

Stress at work, home or school has a huge impact on your health. Tell your family doctor about what stresses you out.

Are you being abused?

Your family doctor can spot signs of abuse. They can direct you to help. If you’re in an abusive relationship, whether physical or emotional, a doctor can direct you to the right help for you.

Open communication with your family doctor

Physical, mental and emotional health depend on open and honest communication. Talking with your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah can be the first step to staying healthy for life.
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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

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Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

Urgent Care Clinic in 84119 84120 84128 and Family Doctor in 84119 84120 84128 and
Medical Care in 84119 84120 84128

Call Us 801-997-6116
CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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