Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SALT LAKE CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah

Some medical situations require more than a bandage and home remedies. Our Salt Lake City, Utah urgent care clinic offers a nice balance between emergency room situations and a trip to the doctor’s office. Examples of some of the situations we treat include vomiting, sprains, eye infections, potentially broken or fractured bones and fevers. We’re also well-prepared for such emergency situations as seizures, chest pains, unstoppable bleeding and extreme abdominal pain.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Flu Shots
Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah
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Medical Care in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109

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Taking extra care with cleaning supplies around the house

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure is something no one wants to hear at the urgent care clinic. In fact, few people ever want to be in an urgent care clinic. The trouble is, many of the problems that an these clinics treat could be avoided with some knowledge and a little bit of planning.

Feel like a trip to urgent care clinic might be just around the corner? Here are some tips to help you make your home safer and your family less accident prone.

Avoid the urgent care clinic: keep hazards out of children’s reach

Many cleaning supplies can be hazardous if swallowed. With many, even accident skin contact will require a trip to the urgent care clinic. Install childproof locks on kitchen and laundry room cupboards where you store these. Install locks on medicine cabinets in your bathroom, as well.

Make sure your medicines and prescriptions are properly labelled, too. Try to keep your prescriptions in the containers they came in, so no one mistakes them for something harmless. This also applies to cleaning supplies like bleach and ammonia.

Don’t forget cleaning supplies you keep outside, or in a tool shed or garage. Windshield wiper fluid, pool cleansers and pesticides can be extremely dangerous if not handled properly.

Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen The kitchen is where most home fires can start. Never leave pans unattended when deep-frying, and watch out for overheating. Keep a home fire extinguisher that’s appropriate for grease fires in easy reach, and make sure that you know how to use it.

Make sure that your home is equipped with enough smoke alarms — at least one for every floor, set where smoke rises. Check them regularly to ensure they work and replace the batteries twice a year.

Install a carbon monoxide detector

Unfortunately, carbon monoxide poisoning cases are all too frequent at an urgent care center. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and deadly gas — that’s why it’s called the “silent killer.” Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home, and regularly check that it’s working.

Remove slip and trip hazards

An area rug that slides on a hardwood or tile floor is an accident that’s just begging to happen. Secure it in place with non-slip carpet tabs or double-sided carpet tape.

Don’t string long extension cords across rooms, even along the wall. In heavy traffic areas like recreation rooms, family rooms and hallways, they can tangle feet. Even a bedroom is a bad place for an extension cord, because it’s hard to see them in the dark, such as when you wake up in the middle of the night to attend to a crying child, for instance.

Clean spills immediately

Water, grease or any liquid is a major slip hazard. Clean up all spills immediately to avoid falls.

Keep stairs clear

Storing items on a stair, even temporarily, is another tripping hazard. A fall down just five stairs required a trip to the urgent care clinic for this writer.

A light at both the bottom and the top of the stairs will help your family avoid any tripping hazards.

Put away tools

Making sure tools are in their proper place can prevent accidents for not only children, but adults as well. A major cause of trips to the urgent care clinic is something heavy falling from a height — such as a hammer hung on an insecure pegboard.

Keep a well-stocked first aid kit

Accidents do happen, even when you take measures to prevent them. Having a first-aid kit — or more than one — will ensure you’re ready to respond when needed. You can have one for the house, and another for each vehicle.

It should include:

  • a list of emergency phone numbers, including poison control, family doctor and your pharmacist
  • a first-aid manual with clear, easy to understand instructions
  • disposable gloves — choose vinyl if you or someone in your family is allergic to latex
  • digital thermometer
  • bandages of different sizes
  • a roll of gauze or gauze pads
  • adhesive tape
  • disinfectant
  • antibiotic ointment
  • antibacterial wipes or cleaner
  • pain reliever such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
  • antihistamine tablets or liquid for allergic reactions
  • hydrocortisone cream for rashes
  • a one- to three-day supply of any medications you take regularly.

The safe home

People who work in an urgent care center in West Valley Utah have seen plenty of injuries that could easily be avoided. Take some time to prevent pain and anguish for you and your family. Otherwise, urgent care awaits.

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Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

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Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.

Falls

Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.

Collisions

Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.

Drowning

Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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Work-related injuries that require emergency care

When should you take a co-worker to seek emergency care for a work-related injury? This past year, private industry employees suffered nearly 3 million non-fatal work-related injuries and illnesses in the U.S. That’s nearly 8,000 every day. Although the numbers of work-related injuries have been falling over the years, when it happens to you or a co-worker, you need to know how to respond.

Falls that involve a bump to the head, or heavy objects falling and striking the head, can lead to concussions. We are now becoming more aware of the serious, long-term and even life-threatening consequences of concussions. This is a major issue among work-related injuries. The following symptoms can be signs of a concussion immediately after a work-related injury. If a co-worker exhibits any of these, take him or her to receive emergency care.

  • confusion, agitation, restlessness
  • slurred speech, trouble walking or other signs of decreased coordination
  • weakness
  • numbness in the head or other parts of the body
  • severe or worsening headaches
  • vomiting
  • seizures
  • convulsions

Hand injuries

A shallow cut or a pinched finger might seem like nothing to worry about, but work-related injuries involving a hand can lead to life-long disability. Seek emergency care for any of these symptoms:

  • severe bleeding
  • numbness
  • loss of motion or strength
  • exposed bones or tendons.

Eye injuries

Most people will seek attention for an eye injury without question. But you do need professional medical attention if you see cloudy, dark or bright areas in your vision. These can be signs of serious and potentially permanent problems stemming from work-related injuries.

Lacerations

Cuts, scrapes and puncture wounds can lead to extreme bleeding and nerve damage. Some can be minor, but seek urgent care for any of these symptoms:

  • weakness or numbness
  • inability to move a finger or other injured area
  • pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or circulation problems.

Also, you should seek urgent care for any work-related injuries involving puncture wounds or foreign materials or objects entering your body.

Trauma

Bone sprains and breaks require urgent care. For breaks, call 911 and immobilize the affected area. For ankle sprains, remember the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

  • Rest the ankle. Do not put any weight on it. Assist the injured person to a chair or safe area to rest, or to transportation to urgent care.
  • Ice. Apply an ice pack or even a bag of frozen peas or corn to the sprained ankle.
  • Compression. Use a compression bandage to help control swelling, and immobilize and support the ankle.
  • Elevation. Recline and raise the ankle above the waist.

Burns

Minor burns can usually be treated in the workplace or at home without professional care. More severe burns, and all chemical burns, require professional emergency care as quickly as possible. Quick action is important for any kind of burn. Immediately cool the burned area with cold water, ice or even snow. Give the victim a painkiller and apply a soothing cream or gel.

If the burn only appears as redness on the skin in a small area, it’s probably a first-degree burn, which usually heals within seven to 10 days. If the burn is to a large are of skin—more than 3 in. across—seek emergency care. More serious burns can result in blisters, which can pop and leak. It’s important to keep the burns clean to prevent infection. Immediately run cool water over the burned area for 15 minutes, take pain medication and apply an antibiotic cream. Don’t use cotton balls, as the thin fibers can stick to the wound and lead to infection.

Third-degree burns penetrate through the skin to the flesh, tendons and bones below. They can also cause extensive nerve damage. They’re distinguished by severe symptoms, such as waxy and white color, charring to the skin, a raised and leathery texture, and blisters that do not pop or heal. Call 911 immediately if you or a co-worker experiences a third-degree (or worse) burn, or any kind of chemical burn.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in Cottonwood Heights.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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