Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SALT LAKE CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

For some medical situations, you can’t wait several days before your doctor has an opening, and other situations aren’t dire enough to warrant a trip to the emergency room. For either situation, you might be better off going to a Utah urgent care clinic. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here to take care of your medical needs and do so in a way that’s efficient and affordable.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah

Some medical situations require more than a bandage and home remedies. Our Salt Lake City, Utah urgent care clinic offers a nice balance between emergency room situations and a trip to the doctor’s office. Examples of some of the situations we treat include vomiting, sprains, eye infections, potentially broken or fractured bones and fevers. We’re also well-prepared for such emergency situations as seizures, chest pains, unstoppable bleeding and extreme abdominal pain.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Flu Treatment, Doctor, Immunizations
Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109 and Family Doctor in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109 and
Medical Care in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109

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How to keep kids healthy and safe this summer

No one plans to visit the urgent care clinic, especially when summer is here. We want to enjoy the hot weather, sunny skies and extra free time. Kids, especially, love the freedom of being out of school in summer. They can swim, play sports, hike through nature and spend unstructured time with their friends.

Unfortunately, with the added freedom, kids can get injured, requiring a trip to the urgent care clinic. As parents, you need to know what injuries you can deal with, which ones need an urgent care clinic, and what situations require the help of an emergency room. Fortunately, there are some pretty simple things you can do to reduce the likelihood you’ll need to make that trip to the urgent care clinic in the first place.

The main reasons kids need urgent care

  • Drowning: While drowning is rare, the rate doubles in summer compared to the rest of the year. It’s not noisy — children tend to sink quietly and quickly under the water. By all means, teach children water safety and swimming, but never let them swim alone or without adult supervision. That means you’re not sitting beside the pool, reading a book — you’re paying attention to the child the whole time they’re in or near the water. And for children under 5 years old, you need to be in the water with them, less than an arm’s length away.
  • Bike accidents: Bicycle-related injuries and deaths increase 45 percent every summer, according to U.S. News. Head trauma from bicycles is one of the most easily preventable injuries. All you need to do is ensure that your children wear a properly fitting bicycle helmet, approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Automobile accidents: Make sure children smaller than 4-foot-9-inches and weighing less than 80 pounds ride in a properly fitting car seat or booster seat, and everyone larger than that is wearing a seatbelt at all times. Motor vehicle accidents account for nearly 200,000 injuries to people under age 14 every year — and thousands of deaths, as well.
  • Pedestrian accidents: Kids are outdoors more in the warm weather, and those under 10 years may not have the ability to judge speed or distance of moving vehicles. Supervision of smaller children is key, as is education on road safety for older kids. Safe Kids USA recommends that adults walk completely around their vehicle to make sure that small children are not playing or sitting behind or under the car before starting the engine.
  • Burns: Barbeques, campfires, fire pits and fireworks are all attractive to kids. According to the Centers for Disease Control, a third of people injured by fireworks are under age 15. Close supervision around fireworks and all other heat sources is essential to avoid that trip to the urgent care clinic.
  • Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries to children all year round, and spike 21 percent during the summer. More open windows, playing on the jungle gym, climbing trees and rocks and other summer activities can be fun, but can be dangerous, too. Safe Kids USA recommends supervision and well-fitted, rubber-soled shoes to reduce falls.
  • Accidental strangulation: Anything that hangs around the neck, even a hoodie, can get caught when a child is on a play structure, bicycle or other equipment. Strangulation causes half of all playground deaths among children.
  • Dehydration: Kids who are playing sports or otherwise active in the hot weather can become dehydrated even before they feel thirsty. In hot weather, make sure they drink before engaging in sports, and take a fluid break at least every 20 minutes. Watch for signs of lethargy or grogginess.

Urgent care clinic or emergency room?

Go to the emergency room for acute, life-threatening injuries or illnesses. Remember that the ER will treat the most acute cases first, which means you may be waiting a long time with a child who has a fever.

Sometimes it’s hard to make the decision, and some parents opt for the ER “just in case.” For infants less than two months old who have a fever, head for the ER immediately. Broken bones, severe and sustained bleeding, loss of consciousness, dehydration and infections that can cause loss of life are also signs to go to the ER.

You should opt for the urgent care clinic for:

  • minor cuts
  • sprains and strains
  • rashes and other skin irritations
  • asthma and wheezing.

The FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah is ready for you and your kids, whenever you may need us. Especially this summer!

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The difference between urgent care and primary care

The number of urgent care clinics in the U.S. is growing because they answer a need in the community: medical care and treatment that responds to what you need at the moment. The urgent care clinic is set up to treat things like ear, eye or skin infections, sprains and strains and injuries that require immediate treatment but are not life-threatening.

It can be confusing. How do you decide between your primary care physician (also known as your family doctor), the hospital emergency room and urgent care?

Your primary care doctor is the first place you go for health care, services and advice. This is where you receive your regular check-ups, and it’s the primary care physician’s job to coordinate specialized services, advice and information on family health. This is the doctor you turn to for your long-term health issues and concerns as you advance through key life stages.

An urgent clinic is for those times when you need health care or treatment immediately, but it’s not life-threatening. This can include persistent coughs, strange rashes, eye or throat infections, nausea and vomiting — the list goes on. These clinics are able to treat some long-term conditions, such as asthma and back pain. First Med clinics also provide occupational medical services, such as drug and alcohol testing and physical evaluations for employers, sports and school.

If you have a broken leg, an urgent care clinic may splint the injury and then send you by ambulance to a hospital emergency room. On the other hand, these clinics are not the place to take someone who is having a heart attack. In other words, the urgent care clinic can provide a complete range of treatment for minor illnesses, sprains and strains, and on-the-job injuries, as long as there's no threat to life.

Benefits of urgent care

  • Availability. They’re open every day and into the evening, so they’re ready when you have an issue, even when your family doctor is not.
  • Range of services. Urgent care clinics are equipped and ready to deal with whatever your situation may be, from a sprain to a rash, a fever or an infection.
  • Affiliations with hospitals. Most clinics have affiliations with local hospitals and can refer you for the follow-up care you may need.

When to choose your family doctor

While the urgent care clinic is available when you need it, it’s not a substitute for your regular primary care doctor. Your family doctor knows your medical history: your allergies, previous injuries and illnesses, and medical preferences. Your primary doctor is also the right choice for regular, annual medical check-ups, continuing care, information and advice on long-term issues or to renew prescriptions.

Remember that the co-pay for a visit to your primary care doctor is usually much less than that of a visit to the hospital emergency room.

When to choose First Med

Look to urgent care in West Jordan Utah when you need medical attention outside of regular office hours. For example, if you sprain your ankle, fall off a ladder at work, or develop a sudden fever or rash. They’re also suitable for treating flus and colds, or if your child has an ear infection.

When to choose the hospital ER

Emergency rooms are for treating urgent, acute and life-threatening conditions, such as a heart attack or stroke, gunshot or knife wounds, severe limb, back or head injuries or anything else that may have a long-term or life-threatening implication.

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Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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