Urgent Care Clinic 84070




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84070

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Urgent Care Clinic 84070

Just because we aren’t an emergency room or physician’s office doesn’t mean you can’t use your health insurance to pay for the medical care you receive at a FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights. We accept various plans, including Aetna, TriCare, Arches Health Plan, Medicaid, Tall Tree Administrators and Cigna.

Just because we aren’t an emergency room or physician’s office doesn’t mean you can’t use your health insurance to pay for the medical care you receive at a FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights. We accept various plans, including Aetna, TriCare, Arches Health Plan, Medicaid, Tall Tree Administrators and Cigna.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, West Jordan, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Nausea, Infections, Headaches, Rashes
Urgent Care Clinic 84070
Urgent Care Clinic 84070
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

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The difference between urgent care and primary care

The number of urgent care clinics in the U.S. is growing because they answer a need in the community: medical care and treatment that responds to what you need at the moment. The urgent care clinic is set up to treat things like ear, eye or skin infections, sprains and strains and injuries that require immediate treatment but are not life-threatening.

It can be confusing. How do you decide between your primary care physician (also known as your family doctor), the hospital emergency room and urgent care?

Your primary care doctor is the first place you go for health care, services and advice. This is where you receive your regular check-ups, and it’s the primary care physician’s job to coordinate specialized services, advice and information on family health. This is the doctor you turn to for your long-term health issues and concerns as you advance through key life stages.

An urgent clinic is for those times when you need health care or treatment immediately, but it’s not life-threatening. This can include persistent coughs, strange rashes, eye or throat infections, nausea and vomiting — the list goes on. These clinics are able to treat some long-term conditions, such as asthma and back pain. First Med clinics also provide occupational medical services, such as drug and alcohol testing and physical evaluations for employers, sports and school.

If you have a broken leg, an urgent care clinic may splint the injury and then send you by ambulance to a hospital emergency room. On the other hand, these clinics are not the place to take someone who is having a heart attack. In other words, the urgent care clinic can provide a complete range of treatment for minor illnesses, sprains and strains, and on-the-job injuries, as long as there's no threat to life.

Benefits of urgent care

  • Availability. They’re open every day and into the evening, so they’re ready when you have an issue, even when your family doctor is not.
  • Range of services. Urgent care clinics are equipped and ready to deal with whatever your situation may be, from a sprain to a rash, a fever or an infection.
  • Affiliations with hospitals. Most clinics have affiliations with local hospitals and can refer you for the follow-up care you may need.

When to choose your family doctor

While the urgent care clinic is available when you need it, it’s not a substitute for your regular primary care doctor. Your family doctor knows your medical history: your allergies, previous injuries and illnesses, and medical preferences. Your primary doctor is also the right choice for regular, annual medical check-ups, continuing care, information and advice on long-term issues or to renew prescriptions.

Remember that the co-pay for a visit to your primary care doctor is usually much less than that of a visit to the hospital emergency room.

When to choose First Med

Look to urgent care in West Jordan Utah when you need medical attention outside of regular office hours. For example, if you sprain your ankle, fall off a ladder at work, or develop a sudden fever or rash. They’re also suitable for treating flus and colds, or if your child has an ear infection.

When to choose the hospital ER

Emergency rooms are for treating urgent, acute and life-threatening conditions, such as a heart attack or stroke, gunshot or knife wounds, severe limb, back or head injuries or anything else that may have a long-term or life-threatening implication.

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How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

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  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
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  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
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  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
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  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
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  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
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  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
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  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

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Work-related injuries that require emergency care

When should you take a co-worker to seek emergency care for a work-related injury? This past year, private industry employees suffered nearly 3 million non-fatal work-related injuries and illnesses in the U.S. That’s nearly 8,000 every day. Although the numbers of work-related injuries have been falling over the years, when it happens to you or a co-worker, you need to know how to respond.

Falls that involve a bump to the head, or heavy objects falling and striking the head, can lead to concussions. We are now becoming more aware of the serious, long-term and even life-threatening consequences of concussions. This is a major issue among work-related injuries. The following symptoms can be signs of a concussion immediately after a work-related injury. If a co-worker exhibits any of these, take him or her to receive emergency care.

  • confusion, agitation, restlessness
  • slurred speech, trouble walking or other signs of decreased coordination
  • weakness
  • numbness in the head or other parts of the body
  • severe or worsening headaches
  • vomiting
  • seizures
  • convulsions

Hand injuries

A shallow cut or a pinched finger might seem like nothing to worry about, but work-related injuries involving a hand can lead to life-long disability. Seek emergency care for any of these symptoms:

  • severe bleeding
  • numbness
  • loss of motion or strength
  • exposed bones or tendons.

Eye injuries

Most people will seek attention for an eye injury without question. But you do need professional medical attention if you see cloudy, dark or bright areas in your vision. These can be signs of serious and potentially permanent problems stemming from work-related injuries.

Lacerations

Cuts, scrapes and puncture wounds can lead to extreme bleeding and nerve damage. Some can be minor, but seek urgent care for any of these symptoms:

  • weakness or numbness
  • inability to move a finger or other injured area
  • pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or circulation problems.

Also, you should seek urgent care for any work-related injuries involving puncture wounds or foreign materials or objects entering your body.

Trauma

Bone sprains and breaks require urgent care. For breaks, call 911 and immobilize the affected area. For ankle sprains, remember the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

  • Rest the ankle. Do not put any weight on it. Assist the injured person to a chair or safe area to rest, or to transportation to urgent care.
  • Ice. Apply an ice pack or even a bag of frozen peas or corn to the sprained ankle.
  • Compression. Use a compression bandage to help control swelling, and immobilize and support the ankle.
  • Elevation. Recline and raise the ankle above the waist.

Burns

Minor burns can usually be treated in the workplace or at home without professional care. More severe burns, and all chemical burns, require professional emergency care as quickly as possible. Quick action is important for any kind of burn. Immediately cool the burned area with cold water, ice or even snow. Give the victim a painkiller and apply a soothing cream or gel.

If the burn only appears as redness on the skin in a small area, it’s probably a first-degree burn, which usually heals within seven to 10 days. If the burn is to a large are of skin—more than 3 in. across—seek emergency care. More serious burns can result in blisters, which can pop and leak. It’s important to keep the burns clean to prevent infection. Immediately run cool water over the burned area for 15 minutes, take pain medication and apply an antibiotic cream. Don’t use cotton balls, as the thin fibers can stick to the wound and lead to infection.

Third-degree burns penetrate through the skin to the flesh, tendons and bones below. They can also cause extensive nerve damage. They’re distinguished by severe symptoms, such as waxy and white color, charring to the skin, a raised and leathery texture, and blisters that do not pop or heal. Call 911 immediately if you or a co-worker experiences a third-degree (or worse) burn, or any kind of chemical burn.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in Cottonwood Heights.

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First Aid tips to use before you reach an urgent care clinic

When people suffer a traumatic injury, getting them to the closest urgent care clinic is vital. But if you are on the scene with them, there are things you can do immediately to help before and during your trip to an urgent care clinic.

If there is a splinter or glass embedded in the skin or wound, first wash the area around the wound with soap and water. Sterilize a pair of tweezers with rubbing alcohol, then use them to slowly pull the object out. If there are several pieces of glass that you cannot remove, gently wrap the area with a clean cloth and go to an urgent care clinic or emergency department.

Press a clean cloth firmly on any bleeding wound and hold it in place until the blood flow stops. This can take from three minutes to 15 minutes. If you have time, clean the wound with lukewarm running water.

If the wound is the result of an animal scratch or bite, wash it gently with soap and rinse it with lukewarm water. Cover it with gauze or a bandage and head for the urgent care clinic.

Burns

Act quickly: Time is critical with burns. Immediately hold the burn under cool running water or, if it’s available, apply snow to the burn. Keep it under the water or snow until the pain subsides. Cover the burned area and any small blisters with gauze. Place tape or a bandage loosely over the wound. Go to the urgent care clinic if the burn is on the hands, face or genitals, or if it covers an area of the body larger than a quarter-inch.

For deep burns or a burn with a surface area of more than 10 percent of the body, call 911. Cover the victim with a blanket to prevent hypothermia until medical care arrives.

Insect bites and stings

Bees will leave part of their stinger under the skin. It must be removed immediately. Don’t use tweezers, which can squeeze more venom into the wound. Instead, hold a fingernail or, better yet, a credit card at an angle over the stinger. Gently scrape the stinger out without breaking it.

Go to an urgent care clinic if the victim begins to cough, has a hoarse voice or exhibits trouble breathing, develops hives or appears to have a swollen tongue or lips.

Eye injury

You should get to urgent care immediately if you have sustained a hit or a poke in the eye that causes severe pain, sensitivity to light, blurry vision or continuous tears.

If a chemical has been splashed onto the eye, hold the eyelids open and flush with lukewarm water. Call Poison Control.

Hold a cool, wet cloth over the eye as you go to urgent care.

Heart attack

Chest pain, pressure, breathing trouble, cold and sweaty skin, paleness and jaw pain are some signs of a heart attack. Yet there are also soft signs including mild, unfocused chest pain that comes and goes, or starts mild and gets stronger, as well as fatigue and flu-like symptoms.

If you have First Aid training, administer CPR. Perform chest compressions for 30 seconds, followed by two breaths of artificial respiration into the airway. Then continue the compressions. If you are not trained in CPR, compression-only CPR is acceptable as long as the victim has not used up all the oxygen in his or her bloodstream.

Any heart attack requires immediate medical treatment. Call 911 or, if it’s safe, take the victim to the nearest emergency room or urgent care.

Be prepared

You never know when a emergency might happen, so be ready to react quickly with a home First Aid kit. It should contain:

  • emergency telephone numbers — not just 911, but also numbers for your local poison control center, emergency management office and family doctors. Also include home and work numbers for family, friends or neighbors who can help in an emergency. For example, if you have children, it's important to include numbers of people who can look after them in the event you have to take another family member to urgent care.
  • sterile gauze pads or dressings of various sizes
  • adhesive tape
  • bandages
  • antiseptic wipes or fluid
  • eye patches
  • thermometer
  • face shield or pocket mask
  • cloth to make an arm sling
  • scissors
  • tweezers
  • safety pins
  • instant ice packs
  • disposable, non-latex surgical or examination gloves
  • a First Aid manual

Be prepared to take those first steps when an emergency strikes. Then seek professional medical care at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic, a top urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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