Medical Care Sandy Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SANDY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

Check Availability & Pricing

By submitting, I agree by electronic signature to be contacted by a live agent

CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care Sandy Utah

Unlike a traditional doctor, there’s no need for you to make an appointment before taking advantage of urgent care services; you can walk in and we look forward to treating you in a timely manner. We encourage you to plan your visit ahead of time so you have ample time to receive treatment.

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is a great alternative to the emergency room, and you might prefer the way we take care of you. If you like, you’re more than welcome to give us a call if you’d like to learn more about our services, locations and business hours.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, Sandy, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Immunizations, Dehydration, Health Center
Medical Care Sandy Utah
Medical Care Sandy Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090 and Family Doctor in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090 and
Medical Care in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090

REVIEWS


Be The First To Leave a Review!Click Here

Leave Us a Review

How Do We Rate?


By submitting a review you authorize us to use this review publically. Reviews may be removed up to our discrecion.

Thank You for the Great Feedback!

Thanks for letting us know we are doing a great job! Would you mind sharing your review? Click Copy below and choose Google, Facebook or Twitter.



Blog

Blog Post Image

First aid before taking someone to the urgent care clinic

Spring is around the corner, and it’s time for people to get outside, clean up the lawn and garden and fix winter’s damage. It’s also a time when accidents and visits to the urgent care clinic spike: falls off ladders, sprains, cuts and sometimes serious injuries that may require professional treatment at an urgent care clinic.

Usually, these types of incidents require immediate treatment on the spot. Here are some first aid tips everyone should know to treat an accident victim before taking them to an urgent care clinic.

Cuts and wounds

A minor cut can usually be treated at home with a little soap and warm water and a bandage. But a major wound can require professional care.

How do you tell whether someone near year has a minor or major wound? There are clear signs. A scrape may ooze blood slowly, but a cut with flowing blood will need a trip to the urgent care clinic.

Remove any debris or foreign objects from the wound. If it’s a minor cut, wash gently with warm water and soap. Don’t apply disinfectant into the wound — that will only cause pain without having any benefit. If the victim is suffering a wound where the blood flow pulses, it’s an arterial cut, and potentially fatal.

Don’t hesitate. Remove any foreign objects or debris from the wound, and press a bandage, gauze or clean cloth against it. If you cannot find a clean cloth, use whatever’s at hand. Call for an ambulance and don’t move the victim.

Burns

There are three degrees of burns. A first-degree burn affects just the top layer of skin. You can tell it’s a first-degree burn when the skin is reddened and painful, but not blistered. As the skin heals, it can peel.

To treat first-degree burns, run cold water over the area to bring down the temperature. Make sure the affected area is clean, to avoid infection, but don’t wipe it with cotton balls. The little fibers can stick to the burned skin, encouraging infection.

Give the victim over-the-counter pain medication such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. You can apply anesthetic gel or cream to soothe the pain, and protect it with loose gauze.

Don’t apply ice because this can make the damage worse. Also avoid the legendary home remedies of butter or margarine to the wound. They just don’t do anything.

Seek professional medical care if the burn is larger than three inches across, or on the face, knee, foot, spine, or other major joint.

A second-degree burn penetrates beyond the top layer and causes blisters and thickening of the skin. The blisters can break, increasing the risk of infection.

To treat them, run cold water over the burn for at least 15 minutes to cool it. Administer over-the-counter pain relief, and apply antibiotic cream.

Take the victim to the urgent care clinic if the burn is large, or affects the face, hands, buttocks, groin or feet.

Third-degree burns penetrate through all layers of the skin. You can tell them by a waxy, white or a dark brown color, or charring of the skin, and a raised, leathery texture without blisters. These will cause severe scarring unless they receive medical treatment.

Do not try to treat a third-degree burn yourself. Call 911 immediately, then make sure there is no clothing sticking to the burn. Raise the injury over the level of the heart.

Falls

Falls from ladders, roofs and stairs can lead to sprains and breaks. A sprain is over-stretching, or tearing to a tendon or ligament, while a break is a fracture to bone. Both can cause swelling.

You can tell it’s a sprain when there is pain around the soft tissues, but not on the. Pain in the boney area of the ankle, for instance, indicates a break. A sure sign of a break is that the person is not able to put any weight on it.

The treatment is RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation. Help the victim to rest comfortably. At least 24 hours of rest for the sprained joint is essential. Apply ice to reduce pain and swelling, but never apply ice directly to the skin — that hurts. Make an ice pack in a plastic bag, then wrap it in a towel to apply to the injury.

You can apply a compression bandage on a sprain, and then elevate the sprained joint above the level of the heart. You could put pillows under the foot as the victim lies on a bed or couch. Whether it’s a sprain or a break, you should take the victim to an urgent care clinic as quickly as possible.

Heart attack

Heart attacks are the cause of one in seven deaths in the United States. They’re caused by a blockage of arteries that lead to the heart. Symptoms include pressure, pain or squeezing sensation in the chest, back, jaw or neck; nausea, indigestion or abdominal pain; shortness of breath; cold sweat; fatigue; and light-headedness or sudden dizziness.

Symptoms can appear suddenly, but there are advance warnings days or weeks in advance, such as recurring chest pain that can be relieved by rest.

When you see someone with the signs of heart attack, call 911 immediately. Don’t hesitate. Start CPR — cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If the victim is conscious, take them to the urgent care centre or emergency room as quickly as possible.

Learn first aid, but just in case, an urgent care clinic is here for you

These are just a few tips for first aid everyone needs to know today. Use them to the best of your ability, and don’t hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.
Blog Post Image

How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

    -

  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
  • -

  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
  • -

  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
  • -

  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
  • -

  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
  • -

  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
  • -

  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

Blog Post Image

Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.

Falls

Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.

Collisions

Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.

Drowning

Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

Blog Post Image

Create a temporary urgent care clinic in the wilderness

Can you take an urgent care clinic into the wild? The great outdoors is one of the best attributes of life in Utah. But when you’re out enjoying the fresh air and breathtaking vistas, you have to be ready for any emergency. What do you do when you need the services of an urgent care clinic yet are miles away from civilization?

Many of us enjoy hiking, running, canoeing or kayaking, camping and many other ways of communing with our natural environment. And as beneficial as those activities are for our physical and mental health, problems can arise. When you are several hours away from an urgent care clinic, you have to be prepared to take steps yourself.

The most common outdoor injuries include:

  • burns
  • cuts
  • blisters
  • dehydration
  • heat exhaustion
  • hypothermia and frostbite
  • allergic reactions
  • insect and animal bites
  • sprains
  • broken bones

If you’re facing an emergency far from an urgent care clinic or first-aid facility, the most important thing to remember is wilderness first aid. You have to be ready to stabilize the patient until you can get to professional emergency medical help.

Be prepared

As the Boy Scouts like to say: Be prepared. Before you leave on your journey into the wilderness, pack a fully stocked first-aid kit including bandages, sterile gauze, adhesive tape, scissors, tweezers, pain-killers, antiseptic wipes or soap, disposable non-latex gloves, a barrier device such as a face shield or mask, and phone numbers for poison control and emergency response.

Tell someone where you plan to go, when you’re leaving and when you plan to return.

Avoid emergencies

The best emergency-care strategy is to avoid having to go to an urgent care clinic. Planning can make the difference. On a long hike, make sure you bring enough water and easy-to-carry food such as granola bars, nuts, chocolate and other energy-dense snacks. To avoid dehydration and heat stroke, make sure everyone in your party drinks plenty of water. The hotter the day and the more strenuous the walk, the more water everyone will need.

Wearing the right clothing. Remember that footwear is also important. Dress to match the weather. If you’re going out in cold weather or into high elevations where cold is a concern, bring warm and waterproof clothing.

Dress in layers. If temperatures are higher than you expect, you can always remove layers.

Wilderness first-aid tips

In an emergency situation when you’re the only one able to respond, think like a first responder. Remember the basic three phases of wilderness first aid:

  1. Assess the situation. Is the patient in imminent danger of further harm? Would helping him or her put a responder in harm's way? Is the situation stable? For example, slipping and falling is an imminent danger on a steep slope. A patient in a river is in danger of drowning, and the same risk faces anyone who enters the water to help.
  2. Treat the emergency. When you have determined that a situation is stable, treat the injury. Foot blisters can be treated relatively easily, for example. You can find a safe place to sit, assess the injury and apply the appropriate treatment.
  3. Get the patient to emergency medical care. Only after a patient is stabilized should you move him or her. Consider the patient’s state. Can he or she walk with help? You will have to assess the circumstances carefully to determine whether you can take the patient out of the situation to an urgent care clinic or whether you need to call for an emergency response evacuation.

Administer pain killers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In the event of an upper-body injury, the patient can often be evacuated by his or her companions. Before moving the patient, though, make sure any breaks are stabilized. For broken or sprained arms, use a sling to tie the arm close to the body so that it moves as little as possible.

When broken or sprained legs are involved, the best response often is to wait for emergency evacuation to an urgent care clinic. If that’s not possible, stabilize the injury using splints to reduce movement and pain.

Whether you wait for evacuation or do it yourself, being prepared with the right clothing, first-aid supplies and, most importantly, knowledge. If you need expert medical care, take your patient to FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

All logos, designs, trademarks, and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Information deemed accurate but not guaranteed.
2018. All Rights Reserved.