Medical Care Salt Lake City Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SALT LAKE CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

Check Availability & Pricing

By submitting, I agree by electronic signature to be contacted by a live agent

CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care Salt Lake City Utah

Unlike a traditional doctor, there’s no need for you to make an appointment before taking advantage of urgent care services; you can walk in and we look forward to treating you in a timely manner. We encourage you to plan your visit ahead of time so you have ample time to receive treatment.

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is a great alternative to the emergency room, and you might prefer the way we take care of you. If you like, you’re more than welcome to give us a call if you’d like to learn more about our services, locations and business hours.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, West Jordan, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Flu Treatment, Health Center, Minor Illnesses, Nausea, Upper Respiratory Infections
Medical Care Salt Lake City Utah
Medical Care Salt Lake City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109 and Family Doctor in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109 and
Medical Care in 84106 84107 84104 84115 84109

REVIEWS


Be The First To Leave a Review!Click Here

Leave Us a Review

How Do We Rate?


By submitting a review you authorize us to use this review publically. Reviews may be removed up to our discrecion.

Thank You for the Great Feedback!

Thanks for letting us know we are doing a great job! Would you mind sharing your review? Click Copy below and choose Google, Facebook or Twitter.



Blog

Blog Post Image

Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

Blog Post Image

Questions your family doctor should ask you

Staying healthy depends on honest, open communication with your family doctor. When looking for a physician who will look after the health of you and your family, you need to find someone you trust. Your family doctor needs a complete, accurate picture of your health status.

The first step is to gather information from you about your current health, and your health history. When you're choosing a family doctor, look for one who asks you at least these questions:

What medications do you take?

To make the right decisions, your family doctor needs to assess all the medications you’re taking. This includes not only prescription drugs, but also all over-ther-counter, herbal and organic remedies you may be using. Often, they can have negative effects when used together. Herbal remedies can also interfere with prescription medications. For instance, St. John’s Wort may interfere with antidepressants. Ginseng should not be used by people on blood thinners like warfarin.

Your family doctor should ask you about all the medications, prescription and otherwise, that you use regularly.

What medications have you stopped taking?

For many, medications are costly. Too many people stop taking prescription medications, or reduce the amount they take, simply because of the cost. Your family doctor should ask you whether you’re taking the medications they’ve prescribed, whether you’re taking the amount prescribed or cutting them in half, like many people do. Tell your family doctor if you’re having any trouble paying for them. They may have a solution.

How much do you drink and smoke? No, really.

Many of us are reluctant to admit how much alcohol, tobacco or other recreational susbstances we consume. There’s just too much social pressure.

But your physician needs to know this to make the right decisions about your health and anything they prescribe for you. Don’t worry — admitting to your family doctor that you use cannabis will not lead to your arrest. Doctors are bound to respect confidentiality. But any substance can have an effect on a prescription medication, so they need to know in order to make the right decisions for your health.

Do you use herbal or organic treatments?

Herbal supplements, vitamins and over-the-counter medications can interact with prescription drugs. For example, weight loss supplements can put excess stress on your heart. Tell your family physician if you’re using any of these so they don’t prescribe a medication that injures your health.

What is your health history?

To make good decisions about your health needs, your family doctor needs to know your complete medical history. This includes serious illnesses and injuries you had when you were young, even if it was a long time ago.

They also need to know about your family history. Diabetes, cancer and heart disease often have a hereditary factor. Knowing that your family has a tendency toward some kind of health issue can help your family doctor make recommendations for prevention.

Do you notice blood in your stool?

The doctor’s office is the place to drop your embarrassment. No one wants to talk about poop, but blood in your stool can be a major warning sign for serious health issues, including cancer. The key is catching it early. Don’t be too embarrassed to tell your family doctor about it.

Also tell your doctor about any changes in your bathroom habits —such as, you’re constipated after years of clock-like regularity.

How often do you exercise — really?

Physical activity is vital to your physical and mental health. While we all want to tell people we work out three days a week, your doctor needs an accurate picture to make the right assessments for your health.

Are you under stress?

Stress at work, home or school has a huge impact on your health. Tell your family doctor about what stresses you out.

Are you being abused?

Your family doctor can spot signs of abuse. They can direct you to help. If you’re in an abusive relationship, whether physical or emotional, a doctor can direct you to the right help for you.

Open communication with your family doctor

Physical, mental and emotional health depend on open and honest communication. Talking with your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah can be the first step to staying healthy for life.
Blog Post Image

Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

Blog Post Image

How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

    -

  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
  • -

  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
  • -

  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
  • -

  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
  • -

  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
  • -

  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
  • -

  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

All logos, designs, trademarks, and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Information deemed accurate but not guaranteed.
2018. All Rights Reserved.