Medical Care 84128




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84128

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

Check Availability & Pricing

By submitting, I agree by electronic signature to be contacted by a live agent

CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care 84128

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is a great alternative to the emergency room, and you might prefer the way we take care of you. If you like, you’re more than welcome to give us a call if you’d like to learn more about our services, locations and business hours.


We are proudly serving Sandy, West Jordan, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Cold Treatment
Medical Care 84128
Medical Care 84128
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

REVIEWS


Be The First To Leave a Review!Click Here

Leave Us a Review

How Do We Rate?


By submitting a review you authorize us to use this review publically. Reviews may be removed up to our discrecion.

Thank You for the Great Feedback!

Thanks for letting us know we are doing a great job! Would you mind sharing your review? Click Copy below and choose Google, Facebook or Twitter.



Blog

Blog Post Image

Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.

Falls

Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.

Collisions

Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.

Drowning

Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

Blog Post Image

Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

Blog Post Image

How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

    -

  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
  • -

  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
  • -

  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
  • -

  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
  • -

  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
  • -

  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
  • -

  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

Blog Post Image

The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

All logos, designs, trademarks, and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Information deemed accurate but not guaranteed.
2018. All Rights Reserved.