Medical Care 84104




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84104

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care 84104

Our medical care in 84104 feature the most cutting edge medical technology and experienced medical professionals who know how to put patients at ease and ensure they understand their medical condition. If necessary, we can refer you to a primary care provider if your situation warrants it.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, West Jordan, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Upper Respiratory Infections, Allergic Reactions and much more. , InstaCare, Nausea
Medical Care 84104
Medical Care 84104
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

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Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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Tips for avoiding workplace injuries that will land you in urgent care

During the working day, many cases arriving at an urgent care clinic are workers who are injured on the job. Despite an increased focus on workplace safety, millions of American workers are injured on the job every year, and nearly 900,000 injuries on the work site that required the employee to take time off work.

The tragedy of workplace injuries is not just the required trip to urgent care; it’s that many are preventable. Knowing where the hazards are and some simple tips can help you avoid a trip from the workplace to the urgent care clinic.

What drives workers to urgent care

The most frequent causes of workplace injuries seem commonplace: slips, trips and falls, being struck by an object or equipment, and overexertion. These may seem innocuous, but in a manufacturing operation, they can be serious enough to send the injured employee to the urgent care clinic.

Workplace injuries can also be costly for the employer, with serious impacts on productivity. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 2.9 million workplace injuries and illnesses in private industry in 2016. While this is down by 48,000 compared to the previous year, it’s still a lot of pain and suffering, and cost. Injuries in the manufacturing industry led to a median of nine work days before the injured worker could return to the job. In the meantime, the employer either loses the productivity of that employee, or must scramble to find someone else to fill in.

They can be even more serious. In 2016, 991 workers in private construction businesses were killed as a result of workplace injuries. Again, the main causes were falls and being struck by an object. In construction, the next leading cause of death on the work site was electrocution, followed by being caught/in-between. According to the Department of Labor, eliminating these “fatal four” causes could save more than 600 lives every year.

Tips to avoid workplace injuries

The first step is to know the hazards of your workplace. When you start on the job, familiarize yourself with the work site, noting the location of all equipment, high racks, stairs, steps and any other hazards.

Point out possible hazards or causes of accidents to management, such as a worn cable, strap or safety guard on equipment. Broken windows or spilled liquids may seem like something that can be fixed later — until someone gets injured.

Materials lying on the floor, requiring employees to step over them, may not seem like a serious issue — until an employee trips and sprains an ankle, required several days off work. Stay alert on the job. Statistics show that most of the workers who suffer accidents on the job are tired or sleepy.

Employers in manufacturing and construction are required by law to provide safety training to all employees, full-time and part-time. Follow all the safety rules, guidelines and posters. Do not take shortcuts or avoid wearing safety harnesses and gear. This includes hard hats, safety goggles, gloves, face masks, safety shoes and earplugs.

Never take on a high-risk job you have not been trained for. This exposes you to risk unnecessarily. Never over-reach for a tool, equipment or materials. If you need to strain to reach or lift something, stop and move, or use lifting equipment.

When picking up a heavy object, bend with your knees and lift with your legs, and not your back. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or equipment if it’s too heavy.

If you need urgent care

Don’t hesitate to seek out professional urgent care in West Jordan Utah if you do suffer a serious workplace injury. “Walking off” a sprain or a blow to the head can lead to more serious conditions, possibly long-term or even permanent.

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Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

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How to tell when your child needs an urgent care clinic

One of parents’ biggest concerns is the health of their children. So it's natural that many parents struggle with whether they should look after their children at home or take them into an urgent care clinic when they become sick or injured. The decision about whether to visit an urgent care clinic often comes down to the severity of the particular situation.

Children don’t usually become seriously ill without warning. Kids are resilient and often bounce back from illnesses, infections and injuries quickly. Yet parents know their children best, and they know when there is something seriously wrong. Parents are very capable of dealing with the most common minor infections and injuries their children suffer. Parents can usually manage minor scrapes and cuts, bruises and even colds and flus based on their knowledge, a little common sense and a lot of tender loving care. But parents need to know when they should seek the attention of an emergency room or urgent care clinic.

The rule of thumb is this: When a child has suffered an injury or illness that you think might threaten his or her long-term health or lead to permanent harm, it’s time to seek urgent care.

What is an emergency?

You need to take your child to an emergency room or an urgent care clinic immediately for any of these situations:

  • unconsciousness or unresponsiveness when spoken to
  • any loss of consciousness after a head injury, especially if it is accompanied by vomiting, disorientation, confusion or increasing pain
  • seizures, usually shown by rapid, rhythmic jerking or stiffness
  • trouble breathing
  • skin or lips that look blue, gray or purple
  • high fever with neck stiffness
  • pain that is persistent and severe or increasing
  • cuts to the head, abdomen or chest, or that are deep or large elsewhere on the body with extensive bleeding
  • bleeding that does not stop after applying pressure
  • a large burn, or a burn to the groin, face, feet, hands or chest
  • severe hand injuries, which can lead to permanent disability if untreated

Other situations requiring an urgent care clinic

Although it is rare for children to develop a severe illness without any warning signs, there are some symptoms that should alert parents to take their child to urgent care:

  • ear infections, sinus infections, pneumonia or bacterial bronchitis with a fever over 101 degrees for more than five days
  • wheezing with trouble breathing
  • rapid and labored breathing
  • extreme lethargy or uncharacteristic tiredness
  • any eye injuries
  • seeing bright, dark or cloudy areas
  • persistent chest pain
  • repeated vomiting
  • paralysis or weakness
  • testicular swelling or pain
  • change in skin tone
  • not drinking or passing urine, which can be signs of dehydration
  • persistent dizziness
  • flu symptoms that improve but then return with fever and a cough

Sports injuries

One of the most dangerous remedies to sports injuries is the phrase "walk it off." Parents of children who participate in high-energy sports such as soccer, hockey, football, track and even baseball need to be aware of common injuries that require a trip to urgent care.

A similar phrase is “no pain, no gain.” This is a myth, and it is especially dangerous for children. Head injuries are common in many sports, and parents as well as health care professionals now understand how hazardous they can be.

After a sports injury, watch for these symptoms:

  • head pain, dizziness or light-headedness, which can be signs of a concussion
  • limping or pain when putting weight on one foot, which can indicate a sprain
  • difficulty standing, sitting or moving normally
  • tingling, numbness or weakness in limbs, fingers or toes
  • sharp pain during physical activity
  • difficulty sleeping after activity, which can be another sign of concussion.

With any of these symptoms, take your child to an urgent care clinic.

When in doubt, err on the side of caution

Kids do recover quickly, but if you have any doubt or questions about the seriousness of an illness or injury, don’t hesitate to seek the services of an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Contact FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic for more information.

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