Medical Care 84092




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84092

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

Check Availability & Pricing

By submitting, I agree by electronic signature to be contacted by a live agent

CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care 84092

Unlike a traditional doctor, there’s no need for you to make an appointment before taking advantage of urgent care services; you can walk in and we look forward to treating you in a timely manner. We encourage you to plan your visit ahead of time so you have ample time to receive treatment.

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is a great alternative to the emergency room, and you might prefer the way we take care of you. If you like, you’re more than welcome to give us a call if you’d like to learn more about our services, locations and business hours.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Flu Treatment, Headaches, Allergic Reactions and much more. , Rashes,
Medical Care 84092
Medical Care 84092
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

REVIEWS


Be The First To Leave a Review!Click Here

Leave Us a Review

How Do We Rate?


By submitting a review you authorize us to use this review publically. Reviews may be removed up to our discrecion.

Thank You for the Great Feedback!

Thanks for letting us know we are doing a great job! Would you mind sharing your review? Click Copy below and choose Google, Facebook or Twitter.



Blog

Blog Post Image

Create a temporary urgent care clinic in the wilderness

Can you take an urgent care clinic into the wild? The great outdoors is one of the best attributes of life in Utah. But when you’re out enjoying the fresh air and breathtaking vistas, you have to be ready for any emergency. What do you do when you need the services of an urgent care clinic yet are miles away from civilization?

Many of us enjoy hiking, running, canoeing or kayaking, camping and many other ways of communing with our natural environment. And as beneficial as those activities are for our physical and mental health, problems can arise. When you are several hours away from an urgent care clinic, you have to be prepared to take steps yourself.

The most common outdoor injuries include:

  • burns
  • cuts
  • blisters
  • dehydration
  • heat exhaustion
  • hypothermia and frostbite
  • allergic reactions
  • insect and animal bites
  • sprains
  • broken bones

If you’re facing an emergency far from an urgent care clinic or first-aid facility, the most important thing to remember is wilderness first aid. You have to be ready to stabilize the patient until you can get to professional emergency medical help.

Be prepared

As the Boy Scouts like to say: Be prepared. Before you leave on your journey into the wilderness, pack a fully stocked first-aid kit including bandages, sterile gauze, adhesive tape, scissors, tweezers, pain-killers, antiseptic wipes or soap, disposable non-latex gloves, a barrier device such as a face shield or mask, and phone numbers for poison control and emergency response.

Tell someone where you plan to go, when you’re leaving and when you plan to return.

Avoid emergencies

The best emergency-care strategy is to avoid having to go to an urgent care clinic. Planning can make the difference. On a long hike, make sure you bring enough water and easy-to-carry food such as granola bars, nuts, chocolate and other energy-dense snacks. To avoid dehydration and heat stroke, make sure everyone in your party drinks plenty of water. The hotter the day and the more strenuous the walk, the more water everyone will need.

Wearing the right clothing. Remember that footwear is also important. Dress to match the weather. If you’re going out in cold weather or into high elevations where cold is a concern, bring warm and waterproof clothing.

Dress in layers. If temperatures are higher than you expect, you can always remove layers.

Wilderness first-aid tips

In an emergency situation when you’re the only one able to respond, think like a first responder. Remember the basic three phases of wilderness first aid:

  1. Assess the situation. Is the patient in imminent danger of further harm? Would helping him or her put a responder in harm's way? Is the situation stable? For example, slipping and falling is an imminent danger on a steep slope. A patient in a river is in danger of drowning, and the same risk faces anyone who enters the water to help.
  2. Treat the emergency. When you have determined that a situation is stable, treat the injury. Foot blisters can be treated relatively easily, for example. You can find a safe place to sit, assess the injury and apply the appropriate treatment.
  3. Get the patient to emergency medical care. Only after a patient is stabilized should you move him or her. Consider the patient’s state. Can he or she walk with help? You will have to assess the circumstances carefully to determine whether you can take the patient out of the situation to an urgent care clinic or whether you need to call for an emergency response evacuation.

Administer pain killers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In the event of an upper-body injury, the patient can often be evacuated by his or her companions. Before moving the patient, though, make sure any breaks are stabilized. For broken or sprained arms, use a sling to tie the arm close to the body so that it moves as little as possible.

When broken or sprained legs are involved, the best response often is to wait for emergency evacuation to an urgent care clinic. If that’s not possible, stabilize the injury using splints to reduce movement and pain.

Whether you wait for evacuation or do it yourself, being prepared with the right clothing, first-aid supplies and, most importantly, knowledge. If you need expert medical care, take your patient to FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah.

Blog Post Image

How to keep kids healthy and safe this summer

No one plans to visit the urgent care clinic, especially when summer is here. We want to enjoy the hot weather, sunny skies and extra free time. Kids, especially, love the freedom of being out of school in summer. They can swim, play sports, hike through nature and spend unstructured time with their friends.

Unfortunately, with the added freedom, kids can get injured, requiring a trip to the urgent care clinic. As parents, you need to know what injuries you can deal with, which ones need an urgent care clinic, and what situations require the help of an emergency room. Fortunately, there are some pretty simple things you can do to reduce the likelihood you’ll need to make that trip to the urgent care clinic in the first place.

The main reasons kids need urgent care

  • Drowning: While drowning is rare, the rate doubles in summer compared to the rest of the year. It’s not noisy — children tend to sink quietly and quickly under the water. By all means, teach children water safety and swimming, but never let them swim alone or without adult supervision. That means you’re not sitting beside the pool, reading a book — you’re paying attention to the child the whole time they’re in or near the water. And for children under 5 years old, you need to be in the water with them, less than an arm’s length away.
  • Bike accidents: Bicycle-related injuries and deaths increase 45 percent every summer, according to U.S. News. Head trauma from bicycles is one of the most easily preventable injuries. All you need to do is ensure that your children wear a properly fitting bicycle helmet, approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Automobile accidents: Make sure children smaller than 4-foot-9-inches and weighing less than 80 pounds ride in a properly fitting car seat or booster seat, and everyone larger than that is wearing a seatbelt at all times. Motor vehicle accidents account for nearly 200,000 injuries to people under age 14 every year — and thousands of deaths, as well.
  • Pedestrian accidents: Kids are outdoors more in the warm weather, and those under 10 years may not have the ability to judge speed or distance of moving vehicles. Supervision of smaller children is key, as is education on road safety for older kids. Safe Kids USA recommends that adults walk completely around their vehicle to make sure that small children are not playing or sitting behind or under the car before starting the engine.
  • Burns: Barbeques, campfires, fire pits and fireworks are all attractive to kids. According to the Centers for Disease Control, a third of people injured by fireworks are under age 15. Close supervision around fireworks and all other heat sources is essential to avoid that trip to the urgent care clinic.
  • Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries to children all year round, and spike 21 percent during the summer. More open windows, playing on the jungle gym, climbing trees and rocks and other summer activities can be fun, but can be dangerous, too. Safe Kids USA recommends supervision and well-fitted, rubber-soled shoes to reduce falls.
  • Accidental strangulation: Anything that hangs around the neck, even a hoodie, can get caught when a child is on a play structure, bicycle or other equipment. Strangulation causes half of all playground deaths among children.
  • Dehydration: Kids who are playing sports or otherwise active in the hot weather can become dehydrated even before they feel thirsty. In hot weather, make sure they drink before engaging in sports, and take a fluid break at least every 20 minutes. Watch for signs of lethargy or grogginess.

Urgent care clinic or emergency room?

Go to the emergency room for acute, life-threatening injuries or illnesses. Remember that the ER will treat the most acute cases first, which means you may be waiting a long time with a child who has a fever.

Sometimes it’s hard to make the decision, and some parents opt for the ER “just in case.” For infants less than two months old who have a fever, head for the ER immediately. Broken bones, severe and sustained bleeding, loss of consciousness, dehydration and infections that can cause loss of life are also signs to go to the ER.

You should opt for the urgent care clinic for:

  • minor cuts
  • sprains and strains
  • rashes and other skin irritations
  • asthma and wheezing.

The FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah is ready for you and your kids, whenever you may need us. Especially this summer!

Blog Post Image

Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

Blog Post Image

The difference between urgent care and primary care

The number of urgent care clinics in the U.S. is growing because they answer a need in the community: medical care and treatment that responds to what you need at the moment. The urgent care clinic is set up to treat things like ear, eye or skin infections, sprains and strains and injuries that require immediate treatment but are not life-threatening.

It can be confusing. How do you decide between your primary care physician (also known as your family doctor), the hospital emergency room and urgent care?

Your primary care doctor is the first place you go for health care, services and advice. This is where you receive your regular check-ups, and it’s the primary care physician’s job to coordinate specialized services, advice and information on family health. This is the doctor you turn to for your long-term health issues and concerns as you advance through key life stages.

An urgent clinic is for those times when you need health care or treatment immediately, but it’s not life-threatening. This can include persistent coughs, strange rashes, eye or throat infections, nausea and vomiting — the list goes on. These clinics are able to treat some long-term conditions, such as asthma and back pain. First Med clinics also provide occupational medical services, such as drug and alcohol testing and physical evaluations for employers, sports and school.

If you have a broken leg, an urgent care clinic may splint the injury and then send you by ambulance to a hospital emergency room. On the other hand, these clinics are not the place to take someone who is having a heart attack. In other words, the urgent care clinic can provide a complete range of treatment for minor illnesses, sprains and strains, and on-the-job injuries, as long as there's no threat to life.

Benefits of urgent care

  • Availability. They’re open every day and into the evening, so they’re ready when you have an issue, even when your family doctor is not.
  • Range of services. Urgent care clinics are equipped and ready to deal with whatever your situation may be, from a sprain to a rash, a fever or an infection.
  • Affiliations with hospitals. Most clinics have affiliations with local hospitals and can refer you for the follow-up care you may need.

When to choose your family doctor

While the urgent care clinic is available when you need it, it’s not a substitute for your regular primary care doctor. Your family doctor knows your medical history: your allergies, previous injuries and illnesses, and medical preferences. Your primary doctor is also the right choice for regular, annual medical check-ups, continuing care, information and advice on long-term issues or to renew prescriptions.

Remember that the co-pay for a visit to your primary care doctor is usually much less than that of a visit to the hospital emergency room.

When to choose First Med

Look to urgent care in West Jordan Utah when you need medical attention outside of regular office hours. For example, if you sprain your ankle, fall off a ladder at work, or develop a sudden fever or rash. They’re also suitable for treating flus and colds, or if your child has an ear infection.

When to choose the hospital ER

Emergency rooms are for treating urgent, acute and life-threatening conditions, such as a heart attack or stroke, gunshot or knife wounds, severe limb, back or head injuries or anything else that may have a long-term or life-threatening implication.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

All logos, designs, trademarks, and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Information deemed accurate but not guaranteed.
2018. All Rights Reserved.