Medical Care 84088




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84088

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Medical Care 84088

Unlike a traditional doctor, there’s no need for you to make an appointment before taking advantage of urgent care services; you can walk in and we look forward to treating you in a timely manner. We encourage you to plan your visit ahead of time so you have ample time to receive treatment.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, West Jordan, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Cold Treatment, Immunizations, Flu Shots
Medical Care 84088
Medical Care 84088
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

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The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

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How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

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  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
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  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
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  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
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  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
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  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
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  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
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  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

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Taking extra care with cleaning supplies around the house

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure is something no one wants to hear at the urgent care clinic. In fact, few people ever want to be in an urgent care clinic. The trouble is, many of the problems that an these clinics treat could be avoided with some knowledge and a little bit of planning.

Feel like a trip to urgent care clinic might be just around the corner? Here are some tips to help you make your home safer and your family less accident prone.

Avoid the urgent care clinic: keep hazards out of children’s reach

Many cleaning supplies can be hazardous if swallowed. With many, even accident skin contact will require a trip to the urgent care clinic. Install childproof locks on kitchen and laundry room cupboards where you store these. Install locks on medicine cabinets in your bathroom, as well.

Make sure your medicines and prescriptions are properly labelled, too. Try to keep your prescriptions in the containers they came in, so no one mistakes them for something harmless. This also applies to cleaning supplies like bleach and ammonia.

Don’t forget cleaning supplies you keep outside, or in a tool shed or garage. Windshield wiper fluid, pool cleansers and pesticides can be extremely dangerous if not handled properly.

Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen The kitchen is where most home fires can start. Never leave pans unattended when deep-frying, and watch out for overheating. Keep a home fire extinguisher that’s appropriate for grease fires in easy reach, and make sure that you know how to use it.

Make sure that your home is equipped with enough smoke alarms — at least one for every floor, set where smoke rises. Check them regularly to ensure they work and replace the batteries twice a year.

Install a carbon monoxide detector

Unfortunately, carbon monoxide poisoning cases are all too frequent at an urgent care center. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and deadly gas — that’s why it’s called the “silent killer.” Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home, and regularly check that it’s working.

Remove slip and trip hazards

An area rug that slides on a hardwood or tile floor is an accident that’s just begging to happen. Secure it in place with non-slip carpet tabs or double-sided carpet tape.

Don’t string long extension cords across rooms, even along the wall. In heavy traffic areas like recreation rooms, family rooms and hallways, they can tangle feet. Even a bedroom is a bad place for an extension cord, because it’s hard to see them in the dark, such as when you wake up in the middle of the night to attend to a crying child, for instance.

Clean spills immediately

Water, grease or any liquid is a major slip hazard. Clean up all spills immediately to avoid falls.

Keep stairs clear

Storing items on a stair, even temporarily, is another tripping hazard. A fall down just five stairs required a trip to the urgent care clinic for this writer.

A light at both the bottom and the top of the stairs will help your family avoid any tripping hazards.

Put away tools

Making sure tools are in their proper place can prevent accidents for not only children, but adults as well. A major cause of trips to the urgent care clinic is something heavy falling from a height — such as a hammer hung on an insecure pegboard.

Keep a well-stocked first aid kit

Accidents do happen, even when you take measures to prevent them. Having a first-aid kit — or more than one — will ensure you’re ready to respond when needed. You can have one for the house, and another for each vehicle.

It should include:

  • a list of emergency phone numbers, including poison control, family doctor and your pharmacist
  • a first-aid manual with clear, easy to understand instructions
  • disposable gloves — choose vinyl if you or someone in your family is allergic to latex
  • digital thermometer
  • bandages of different sizes
  • a roll of gauze or gauze pads
  • adhesive tape
  • disinfectant
  • antibiotic ointment
  • antibacterial wipes or cleaner
  • pain reliever such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
  • antihistamine tablets or liquid for allergic reactions
  • hydrocortisone cream for rashes
  • a one- to three-day supply of any medications you take regularly.

The safe home

People who work in an urgent care center in West Valley Utah have seen plenty of injuries that could easily be avoided. Take some time to prevent pain and anguish for you and your family. Otherwise, urgent care awaits.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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