Family Doctor West Valley City Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

WEST VALLEY CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

For some medical situations, you can’t wait several days before your doctor has an opening, and other situations aren’t dire enough to warrant a trip to the emergency room. For either situation, you might be better off going to a Utah urgent care clinic. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here to take care of your medical needs and do so in a way that’s efficient and affordable.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor West Valley City Utah

We hope you’ll give us the honor of being your primary provider to keep you and your kids in excellent health. Your West Valley City, Utah family doctor is instrumental in keeping you healthy and answering any questions you might have about your health or the health of your children. One of the best things about having a family doctor is they often treat their patients for decades, which you and your family are sure to enjoy.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, Sandy, West Jordan, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. InstaCare, Doctor
Family Doctor West Valley City Utah
Family Doctor West Valley City Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84119 84120 84128 and Family Doctor in 84119 84120 84128 and
Medical Care in 84119 84120 84128

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Back to school, back to health with your family doctor

The back-to-school season is too often also the back to the family doctor season. In schools today, children are often very close to each other, making it easy to spread germs that they can then bring back home and pass on to siblings and parents — often prompting a visit to the family doctor.

Here are some tips from your family doctor to protect your children’s health at school — and your own, as well. After all, your child's health is of utmost importance.

Make visiting your family doctor a health a routine

Starting a new school year means getting back to the old routine: getting up early, packing lunches, dressing properly, checking schedules and balancing school, work, after-school activities, social life, athletics and family time.

You can help strengthen your children’s and your whole family’s health by reinforcing healthy habits, too. Lead by example and encourage children to do simple but effective things like exercising regularly, getting outdoors often, eating healthy and getting enough sleep.

Vaccinate

Immunizing your children is the best way to protect them against diseases that used to kill thousands of people: diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.

Making sure your own and your children’s vaccinations are complete and up to date also helps to protect the whole community against outbreaks.

And it protects the community, as well. There is no danger of your kids developing these diseases from the immunization.

Practice good hygiene

Frequent hand washing, sneezing into your elbow — build these habits at home so they carry over into the school.

Give your children hand sanitizer to take to school. Remind them to use it before eating lunch or snacks, and after using things that other people use, such as a water fountain, computer, or pencil sharpener.

Discourage children from sharing food, especially drinks with school friends to reduce spread of germs, as well as to avoid exposure to potential allergies.

Eat healthy

A healthy diet is one of the most effective ways to build up your whole family’s health. Make sure everyone gets plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. Your family doctor, as well as the US Department of Agriculture and the Harvard School of Public Health recommend that half of every meal should be fruits and vegetables. Medical studies suggest that we all eat 5 to 10 servings of fruit and vegetables a day. If that seems like a lot, remember that a single apple counts as two servings. Sprinkling berries onto breakfast cereal, adding a carrot and an apple to a school lunch, fruit for an after-school snack, and adding a salad along with a vegetable to dinner, plus fruit for dessert easily brings you to that level.

Instead of sugary treats and candies, pack fruits and vegetables your kids like to eat.

A recent study found that a large number of kids bring their lunches back home from school. Check to see whether your children are eating healthy, and find out why if they’re not.

Get enough sleep

Any family doctor will tell you that Americans don’t get enough sleep. This can be a problem, because lack of adequate sleep weakens the immune system, reduces kids’ ability to concentrate and think, inhibits performance in sports and other physical activities and contributes to obesity.

Children need more sleep than adults, as well:

  • Preschoolers —10 to 13 hours of sleep per day
  • School-aged children 6 to 13 years old — 9 to 11 hours
  • Teenagers 13–17 — 8 to 10 hours.

Exercise together

Make exercise and outdoor activities part of the family routine. Take regular family hikes or bike rides, participate in sports and keep in shape yourself. Setting the example for your kids is the best way to build a lifelong fitness habit.

Visit the family doctor

Even when you’re well, every member of the family should see the family doctor at least once a year for a check-up. Your family doctor can also ensure that the whole family’s immunizations are complete and up to date, and give you advice on any health-related issues.

And if you have any questions or concerns about your children’s or your own health, don’t hesitate to call your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, that's us, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

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The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

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First Aid tips to use before you reach an urgent care clinic

When people suffer a traumatic injury, getting them to the closest urgent care clinic is vital. But if you are on the scene with them, there are things you can do immediately to help before and during your trip to an urgent care clinic.

If there is a splinter or glass embedded in the skin or wound, first wash the area around the wound with soap and water. Sterilize a pair of tweezers with rubbing alcohol, then use them to slowly pull the object out. If there are several pieces of glass that you cannot remove, gently wrap the area with a clean cloth and go to an urgent care clinic or emergency department.

Press a clean cloth firmly on any bleeding wound and hold it in place until the blood flow stops. This can take from three minutes to 15 minutes. If you have time, clean the wound with lukewarm running water.

If the wound is the result of an animal scratch or bite, wash it gently with soap and rinse it with lukewarm water. Cover it with gauze or a bandage and head for the urgent care clinic.

Burns

Act quickly: Time is critical with burns. Immediately hold the burn under cool running water or, if it’s available, apply snow to the burn. Keep it under the water or snow until the pain subsides. Cover the burned area and any small blisters with gauze. Place tape or a bandage loosely over the wound. Go to the urgent care clinic if the burn is on the hands, face or genitals, or if it covers an area of the body larger than a quarter-inch.

For deep burns or a burn with a surface area of more than 10 percent of the body, call 911. Cover the victim with a blanket to prevent hypothermia until medical care arrives.

Insect bites and stings

Bees will leave part of their stinger under the skin. It must be removed immediately. Don’t use tweezers, which can squeeze more venom into the wound. Instead, hold a fingernail or, better yet, a credit card at an angle over the stinger. Gently scrape the stinger out without breaking it.

Go to an urgent care clinic if the victim begins to cough, has a hoarse voice or exhibits trouble breathing, develops hives or appears to have a swollen tongue or lips.

Eye injury

You should get to urgent care immediately if you have sustained a hit or a poke in the eye that causes severe pain, sensitivity to light, blurry vision or continuous tears.

If a chemical has been splashed onto the eye, hold the eyelids open and flush with lukewarm water. Call Poison Control.

Hold a cool, wet cloth over the eye as you go to urgent care.

Heart attack

Chest pain, pressure, breathing trouble, cold and sweaty skin, paleness and jaw pain are some signs of a heart attack. Yet there are also soft signs including mild, unfocused chest pain that comes and goes, or starts mild and gets stronger, as well as fatigue and flu-like symptoms.

If you have First Aid training, administer CPR. Perform chest compressions for 30 seconds, followed by two breaths of artificial respiration into the airway. Then continue the compressions. If you are not trained in CPR, compression-only CPR is acceptable as long as the victim has not used up all the oxygen in his or her bloodstream.

Any heart attack requires immediate medical treatment. Call 911 or, if it’s safe, take the victim to the nearest emergency room or urgent care.

Be prepared

You never know when a emergency might happen, so be ready to react quickly with a home First Aid kit. It should contain:

  • emergency telephone numbers — not just 911, but also numbers for your local poison control center, emergency management office and family doctors. Also include home and work numbers for family, friends or neighbors who can help in an emergency. For example, if you have children, it's important to include numbers of people who can look after them in the event you have to take another family member to urgent care.
  • sterile gauze pads or dressings of various sizes
  • adhesive tape
  • bandages
  • antiseptic wipes or fluid
  • eye patches
  • thermometer
  • face shield or pocket mask
  • cloth to make an arm sling
  • scissors
  • tweezers
  • safety pins
  • instant ice packs
  • disposable, non-latex surgical or examination gloves
  • a First Aid manual

Be prepared to take those first steps when an emergency strikes. Then seek professional medical care at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic, a top urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.

Urgent Care Clinic in 84119 84120 84128 and Family Doctor in 84119 84120 84128 and
Medical Care in 84119 84120 84128

Call Us 801-997-6116
CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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