Family Doctor Sandy Utah




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SANDY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights is all about empowering patients and showing them how medical services should be delivered. We have five locations scattered throughout the Salt Lake City area to better serve you. Let us improve your health and your opinion about the healthcare system.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor Sandy Utah

We hope you’ll give us the honor of being your primary provider to keep you and your kids in excellent health. Your Sandy, Utah family doctor is instrumental in keeping you healthy and answering any questions you might have about your health or the health of your children. One of the best things about having a family doctor is they often treat their patients for decades, which you and your family are sure to enjoy.

Another great thing about having a family doctor is that she or he can save you money. Besides saving by using primary care, your family doctor can go a long way in cutting down your need for a trip to the emergency room, being admitted to the hospital or the need for surgery. Let us help you head unnecessary and avoidable medical as well as financial trouble off at the pass.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, West Jordan, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Nausea
Family Doctor Sandy Utah
Family Doctor Sandy Utah
Urgent Care Clinic in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090 and Family Doctor in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090 and
Medical Care in 84070 84092 84093 84094 84090

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Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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Create a temporary urgent care clinic in the wilderness

Can you take an urgent care clinic into the wild? The great outdoors is one of the best attributes of life in Utah. But when you’re out enjoying the fresh air and breathtaking vistas, you have to be ready for any emergency. What do you do when you need the services of an urgent care clinic yet are miles away from civilization?

Many of us enjoy hiking, running, canoeing or kayaking, camping and many other ways of communing with our natural environment. And as beneficial as those activities are for our physical and mental health, problems can arise. When you are several hours away from an urgent care clinic, you have to be prepared to take steps yourself.

The most common outdoor injuries include:

  • burns
  • cuts
  • blisters
  • dehydration
  • heat exhaustion
  • hypothermia and frostbite
  • allergic reactions
  • insect and animal bites
  • sprains
  • broken bones

If you’re facing an emergency far from an urgent care clinic or first-aid facility, the most important thing to remember is wilderness first aid. You have to be ready to stabilize the patient until you can get to professional emergency medical help.

Be prepared

As the Boy Scouts like to say: Be prepared. Before you leave on your journey into the wilderness, pack a fully stocked first-aid kit including bandages, sterile gauze, adhesive tape, scissors, tweezers, pain-killers, antiseptic wipes or soap, disposable non-latex gloves, a barrier device such as a face shield or mask, and phone numbers for poison control and emergency response.

Tell someone where you plan to go, when you’re leaving and when you plan to return.

Avoid emergencies

The best emergency-care strategy is to avoid having to go to an urgent care clinic. Planning can make the difference. On a long hike, make sure you bring enough water and easy-to-carry food such as granola bars, nuts, chocolate and other energy-dense snacks. To avoid dehydration and heat stroke, make sure everyone in your party drinks plenty of water. The hotter the day and the more strenuous the walk, the more water everyone will need.

Wearing the right clothing. Remember that footwear is also important. Dress to match the weather. If you’re going out in cold weather or into high elevations where cold is a concern, bring warm and waterproof clothing.

Dress in layers. If temperatures are higher than you expect, you can always remove layers.

Wilderness first-aid tips

In an emergency situation when you’re the only one able to respond, think like a first responder. Remember the basic three phases of wilderness first aid:

  1. Assess the situation. Is the patient in imminent danger of further harm? Would helping him or her put a responder in harm's way? Is the situation stable? For example, slipping and falling is an imminent danger on a steep slope. A patient in a river is in danger of drowning, and the same risk faces anyone who enters the water to help.
  2. Treat the emergency. When you have determined that a situation is stable, treat the injury. Foot blisters can be treated relatively easily, for example. You can find a safe place to sit, assess the injury and apply the appropriate treatment.
  3. Get the patient to emergency medical care. Only after a patient is stabilized should you move him or her. Consider the patient’s state. Can he or she walk with help? You will have to assess the circumstances carefully to determine whether you can take the patient out of the situation to an urgent care clinic or whether you need to call for an emergency response evacuation.

Administer pain killers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In the event of an upper-body injury, the patient can often be evacuated by his or her companions. Before moving the patient, though, make sure any breaks are stabilized. For broken or sprained arms, use a sling to tie the arm close to the body so that it moves as little as possible.

When broken or sprained legs are involved, the best response often is to wait for emergency evacuation to an urgent care clinic. If that’s not possible, stabilize the injury using splints to reduce movement and pain.

Whether you wait for evacuation or do it yourself, being prepared with the right clothing, first-aid supplies and, most importantly, knowledge. If you need expert medical care, take your patient to FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah.

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How to keep kids healthy and safe this summer

No one plans to visit the urgent care clinic, especially when summer is here. We want to enjoy the hot weather, sunny skies and extra free time. Kids, especially, love the freedom of being out of school in summer. They can swim, play sports, hike through nature and spend unstructured time with their friends.

Unfortunately, with the added freedom, kids can get injured, requiring a trip to the urgent care clinic. As parents, you need to know what injuries you can deal with, which ones need an urgent care clinic, and what situations require the help of an emergency room. Fortunately, there are some pretty simple things you can do to reduce the likelihood you’ll need to make that trip to the urgent care clinic in the first place.

The main reasons kids need urgent care

  • Drowning: While drowning is rare, the rate doubles in summer compared to the rest of the year. It’s not noisy — children tend to sink quietly and quickly under the water. By all means, teach children water safety and swimming, but never let them swim alone or without adult supervision. That means you’re not sitting beside the pool, reading a book — you’re paying attention to the child the whole time they’re in or near the water. And for children under 5 years old, you need to be in the water with them, less than an arm’s length away.
  • Bike accidents: Bicycle-related injuries and deaths increase 45 percent every summer, according to U.S. News. Head trauma from bicycles is one of the most easily preventable injuries. All you need to do is ensure that your children wear a properly fitting bicycle helmet, approved by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
  • Automobile accidents: Make sure children smaller than 4-foot-9-inches and weighing less than 80 pounds ride in a properly fitting car seat or booster seat, and everyone larger than that is wearing a seatbelt at all times. Motor vehicle accidents account for nearly 200,000 injuries to people under age 14 every year — and thousands of deaths, as well.
  • Pedestrian accidents: Kids are outdoors more in the warm weather, and those under 10 years may not have the ability to judge speed or distance of moving vehicles. Supervision of smaller children is key, as is education on road safety for older kids. Safe Kids USA recommends that adults walk completely around their vehicle to make sure that small children are not playing or sitting behind or under the car before starting the engine.
  • Burns: Barbeques, campfires, fire pits and fireworks are all attractive to kids. According to the Centers for Disease Control, a third of people injured by fireworks are under age 15. Close supervision around fireworks and all other heat sources is essential to avoid that trip to the urgent care clinic.
  • Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries to children all year round, and spike 21 percent during the summer. More open windows, playing on the jungle gym, climbing trees and rocks and other summer activities can be fun, but can be dangerous, too. Safe Kids USA recommends supervision and well-fitted, rubber-soled shoes to reduce falls.
  • Accidental strangulation: Anything that hangs around the neck, even a hoodie, can get caught when a child is on a play structure, bicycle or other equipment. Strangulation causes half of all playground deaths among children.
  • Dehydration: Kids who are playing sports or otherwise active in the hot weather can become dehydrated even before they feel thirsty. In hot weather, make sure they drink before engaging in sports, and take a fluid break at least every 20 minutes. Watch for signs of lethargy or grogginess.

Urgent care clinic or emergency room?

Go to the emergency room for acute, life-threatening injuries or illnesses. Remember that the ER will treat the most acute cases first, which means you may be waiting a long time with a child who has a fever.

Sometimes it’s hard to make the decision, and some parents opt for the ER “just in case.” For infants less than two months old who have a fever, head for the ER immediately. Broken bones, severe and sustained bleeding, loss of consciousness, dehydration and infections that can cause loss of life are also signs to go to the ER.

You should opt for the urgent care clinic for:

  • minor cuts
  • sprains and strains
  • rashes and other skin irritations
  • asthma and wheezing.

The FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah is ready for you and your kids, whenever you may need us. Especially this summer!

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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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