Family Doctor 84106




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84106

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor 84106

If your needs are beyond your family doctor’s medical expertise, she or he can help you find a competent and trustworthy specialist, one you’re sure to get along well with. This is better than trying to find your own specialist, which can result in an extensive period of trial and error. Let us keep your stress to a minimum and your health at the maximum.


We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Sandy, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Cold Treatment, Dehydration
Family Doctor 84106
Family Doctor 84106
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

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Questions your family doctor should ask you

Staying healthy depends on honest, open communication with your family doctor. When looking for a physician who will look after the health of you and your family, you need to find someone you trust. Your family doctor needs a complete, accurate picture of your health status.

The first step is to gather information from you about your current health, and your health history. When you're choosing a family doctor, look for one who asks you at least these questions:

What medications do you take?

To make the right decisions, your family doctor needs to assess all the medications you’re taking. This includes not only prescription drugs, but also all over-ther-counter, herbal and organic remedies you may be using. Often, they can have negative effects when used together. Herbal remedies can also interfere with prescription medications. For instance, St. John’s Wort may interfere with antidepressants. Ginseng should not be used by people on blood thinners like warfarin.

Your family doctor should ask you about all the medications, prescription and otherwise, that you use regularly.

What medications have you stopped taking?

For many, medications are costly. Too many people stop taking prescription medications, or reduce the amount they take, simply because of the cost. Your family doctor should ask you whether you’re taking the medications they’ve prescribed, whether you’re taking the amount prescribed or cutting them in half, like many people do. Tell your family doctor if you’re having any trouble paying for them. They may have a solution.

How much do you drink and smoke? No, really.

Many of us are reluctant to admit how much alcohol, tobacco or other recreational susbstances we consume. There’s just too much social pressure.

But your physician needs to know this to make the right decisions about your health and anything they prescribe for you. Don’t worry — admitting to your family doctor that you use cannabis will not lead to your arrest. Doctors are bound to respect confidentiality. But any substance can have an effect on a prescription medication, so they need to know in order to make the right decisions for your health.

Do you use herbal or organic treatments?

Herbal supplements, vitamins and over-the-counter medications can interact with prescription drugs. For example, weight loss supplements can put excess stress on your heart. Tell your family physician if you’re using any of these so they don’t prescribe a medication that injures your health.

What is your health history?

To make good decisions about your health needs, your family doctor needs to know your complete medical history. This includes serious illnesses and injuries you had when you were young, even if it was a long time ago.

They also need to know about your family history. Diabetes, cancer and heart disease often have a hereditary factor. Knowing that your family has a tendency toward some kind of health issue can help your family doctor make recommendations for prevention.

Do you notice blood in your stool?

The doctor’s office is the place to drop your embarrassment. No one wants to talk about poop, but blood in your stool can be a major warning sign for serious health issues, including cancer. The key is catching it early. Don’t be too embarrassed to tell your family doctor about it.

Also tell your doctor about any changes in your bathroom habits —such as, you’re constipated after years of clock-like regularity.

How often do you exercise — really?

Physical activity is vital to your physical and mental health. While we all want to tell people we work out three days a week, your doctor needs an accurate picture to make the right assessments for your health.

Are you under stress?

Stress at work, home or school has a huge impact on your health. Tell your family doctor about what stresses you out.

Are you being abused?

Your family doctor can spot signs of abuse. They can direct you to help. If you’re in an abusive relationship, whether physical or emotional, a doctor can direct you to the right help for you.

Open communication with your family doctor

Physical, mental and emotional health depend on open and honest communication. Talking with your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah can be the first step to staying healthy for life.
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Work-related injuries that require emergency care

When should you take a co-worker to seek emergency care for a work-related injury? This past year, private industry employees suffered nearly 3 million non-fatal work-related injuries and illnesses in the U.S. That’s nearly 8,000 every day. Although the numbers of work-related injuries have been falling over the years, when it happens to you or a co-worker, you need to know how to respond.

Falls that involve a bump to the head, or heavy objects falling and striking the head, can lead to concussions. We are now becoming more aware of the serious, long-term and even life-threatening consequences of concussions. This is a major issue among work-related injuries. The following symptoms can be signs of a concussion immediately after a work-related injury. If a co-worker exhibits any of these, take him or her to receive emergency care.

  • confusion, agitation, restlessness
  • slurred speech, trouble walking or other signs of decreased coordination
  • weakness
  • numbness in the head or other parts of the body
  • severe or worsening headaches
  • vomiting
  • seizures
  • convulsions

Hand injuries

A shallow cut or a pinched finger might seem like nothing to worry about, but work-related injuries involving a hand can lead to life-long disability. Seek emergency care for any of these symptoms:

  • severe bleeding
  • numbness
  • loss of motion or strength
  • exposed bones or tendons.

Eye injuries

Most people will seek attention for an eye injury without question. But you do need professional medical attention if you see cloudy, dark or bright areas in your vision. These can be signs of serious and potentially permanent problems stemming from work-related injuries.

Lacerations

Cuts, scrapes and puncture wounds can lead to extreme bleeding and nerve damage. Some can be minor, but seek urgent care for any of these symptoms:

  • weakness or numbness
  • inability to move a finger or other injured area
  • pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or circulation problems.

Also, you should seek urgent care for any work-related injuries involving puncture wounds or foreign materials or objects entering your body.

Trauma

Bone sprains and breaks require urgent care. For breaks, call 911 and immobilize the affected area. For ankle sprains, remember the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

  • Rest the ankle. Do not put any weight on it. Assist the injured person to a chair or safe area to rest, or to transportation to urgent care.
  • Ice. Apply an ice pack or even a bag of frozen peas or corn to the sprained ankle.
  • Compression. Use a compression bandage to help control swelling, and immobilize and support the ankle.
  • Elevation. Recline and raise the ankle above the waist.

Burns

Minor burns can usually be treated in the workplace or at home without professional care. More severe burns, and all chemical burns, require professional emergency care as quickly as possible. Quick action is important for any kind of burn. Immediately cool the burned area with cold water, ice or even snow. Give the victim a painkiller and apply a soothing cream or gel.

If the burn only appears as redness on the skin in a small area, it’s probably a first-degree burn, which usually heals within seven to 10 days. If the burn is to a large are of skin—more than 3 in. across—seek emergency care. More serious burns can result in blisters, which can pop and leak. It’s important to keep the burns clean to prevent infection. Immediately run cool water over the burned area for 15 minutes, take pain medication and apply an antibiotic cream. Don’t use cotton balls, as the thin fibers can stick to the wound and lead to infection.

Third-degree burns penetrate through the skin to the flesh, tendons and bones below. They can also cause extensive nerve damage. They’re distinguished by severe symptoms, such as waxy and white color, charring to the skin, a raised and leathery texture, and blisters that do not pop or heal. Call 911 immediately if you or a co-worker experiences a third-degree (or worse) burn, or any kind of chemical burn.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in Cottonwood Heights.

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First aid before taking someone to the urgent care clinic

Spring is around the corner, and it’s time for people to get outside, clean up the lawn and garden and fix winter’s damage. It’s also a time when accidents and visits to the urgent care clinic spike: falls off ladders, sprains, cuts and sometimes serious injuries that may require professional treatment at an urgent care clinic.

Usually, these types of incidents require immediate treatment on the spot. Here are some first aid tips everyone should know to treat an accident victim before taking them to an urgent care clinic.

Cuts and wounds

A minor cut can usually be treated at home with a little soap and warm water and a bandage. But a major wound can require professional care.

How do you tell whether someone near year has a minor or major wound? There are clear signs. A scrape may ooze blood slowly, but a cut with flowing blood will need a trip to the urgent care clinic.

Remove any debris or foreign objects from the wound. If it’s a minor cut, wash gently with warm water and soap. Don’t apply disinfectant into the wound — that will only cause pain without having any benefit. If the victim is suffering a wound where the blood flow pulses, it’s an arterial cut, and potentially fatal.

Don’t hesitate. Remove any foreign objects or debris from the wound, and press a bandage, gauze or clean cloth against it. If you cannot find a clean cloth, use whatever’s at hand. Call for an ambulance and don’t move the victim.

Burns

There are three degrees of burns. A first-degree burn affects just the top layer of skin. You can tell it’s a first-degree burn when the skin is reddened and painful, but not blistered. As the skin heals, it can peel.

To treat first-degree burns, run cold water over the area to bring down the temperature. Make sure the affected area is clean, to avoid infection, but don’t wipe it with cotton balls. The little fibers can stick to the burned skin, encouraging infection.

Give the victim over-the-counter pain medication such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. You can apply anesthetic gel or cream to soothe the pain, and protect it with loose gauze.

Don’t apply ice because this can make the damage worse. Also avoid the legendary home remedies of butter or margarine to the wound. They just don’t do anything.

Seek professional medical care if the burn is larger than three inches across, or on the face, knee, foot, spine, or other major joint.

A second-degree burn penetrates beyond the top layer and causes blisters and thickening of the skin. The blisters can break, increasing the risk of infection.

To treat them, run cold water over the burn for at least 15 minutes to cool it. Administer over-the-counter pain relief, and apply antibiotic cream.

Take the victim to the urgent care clinic if the burn is large, or affects the face, hands, buttocks, groin or feet.

Third-degree burns penetrate through all layers of the skin. You can tell them by a waxy, white or a dark brown color, or charring of the skin, and a raised, leathery texture without blisters. These will cause severe scarring unless they receive medical treatment.

Do not try to treat a third-degree burn yourself. Call 911 immediately, then make sure there is no clothing sticking to the burn. Raise the injury over the level of the heart.

Falls

Falls from ladders, roofs and stairs can lead to sprains and breaks. A sprain is over-stretching, or tearing to a tendon or ligament, while a break is a fracture to bone. Both can cause swelling.

You can tell it’s a sprain when there is pain around the soft tissues, but not on the. Pain in the boney area of the ankle, for instance, indicates a break. A sure sign of a break is that the person is not able to put any weight on it.

The treatment is RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation. Help the victim to rest comfortably. At least 24 hours of rest for the sprained joint is essential. Apply ice to reduce pain and swelling, but never apply ice directly to the skin — that hurts. Make an ice pack in a plastic bag, then wrap it in a towel to apply to the injury.

You can apply a compression bandage on a sprain, and then elevate the sprained joint above the level of the heart. You could put pillows under the foot as the victim lies on a bed or couch. Whether it’s a sprain or a break, you should take the victim to an urgent care clinic as quickly as possible.

Heart attack

Heart attacks are the cause of one in seven deaths in the United States. They’re caused by a blockage of arteries that lead to the heart. Symptoms include pressure, pain or squeezing sensation in the chest, back, jaw or neck; nausea, indigestion or abdominal pain; shortness of breath; cold sweat; fatigue; and light-headedness or sudden dizziness.

Symptoms can appear suddenly, but there are advance warnings days or weeks in advance, such as recurring chest pain that can be relieved by rest.

When you see someone with the signs of heart attack, call 911 immediately. Don’t hesitate. Start CPR — cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If the victim is conscious, take them to the urgent care centre or emergency room as quickly as possible.

Learn first aid, but just in case, an urgent care clinic is here for you

These are just a few tips for first aid everyone needs to know today. Use them to the best of your ability, and don’t hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.
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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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