Family Doctor 84094




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

84094

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.



1950 East 7000 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor 84094

Another great thing about having a family doctor is that she or he can save you money. Besides saving by using primary care, your family doctor can go a long way in cutting down your need for a trip to the emergency room, being admitted to the hospital or the need for surgery. Let us help you head unnecessary and avoidable medical as well as financial trouble off at the pass.


We are proudly serving Sandy, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Nausea, Rashes, InstaCare, Flu Treatment
Family Doctor 84094
Family Doctor 84094
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City

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Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.

Falls

Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.

Collisions

Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.

Drowning

Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

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How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

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  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
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  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
  • -

  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
  • -

  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
  • -

  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
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  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
  • -

  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

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What to expect from an urgent care clinic when you're suffering from an accident injury

An urgent care clinic is a specific form of medical facility, where you can find a range of medical services for illness and accident injury. However, not everyone is familiar with them, and don’t know what to expect, or how to decide whether to seek medical attention from their regular doctor, the emergency room or the urgent care clinic for an accident injury.

If you have an illness or accident injury, here is what you can expect to find at your urgent care clinic.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care clinics are intended for an illness or accident injury that is not life-threatening, but cannot wait overnight or until a primary care doctor is available. For example, strep throat or ear infections, dehydration, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, skin infections, allergic reactions to medication and non life-threating injuries.

The American Association of Urgent Care Medicine defines urgent care as “the provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and accident injury.” The AAUCM explains that urgent care does not replace either the emergency room, nor your primary care giver — your family doctor. The urgent care clinic is useful outside of regular office hours, or when your primary caregiver is away from their clinic.

How to choose the right type of care

It makes no sense to use a baseball bat to swat a fly. Treatment at a hospital’s emergency room (ER) can be very expensive, so they’re best reserved for truly life-threatening emergencies.

Choose the emergency room for severe situations:

  • compound fractures, especially where bone is exposed
  • convulsions or seizures
  • gunshot wounds or deep knife wounds
  • uncontrollable bleeding
  • moderate to severe (second to third-degree) burns
  • poisoning
  • severe abdominal pain
  • signs of heart attack or stroke
  • serious head, back or neck injuries
  • problems related to pregnancy

Is urgent care right for your accident injury?

These are for a medical issue that may not be an accident injury, but still needs treatment in less than 24 hours. Some examples include:

  • falls
  • cuts that require stitches to stop bleeding
  • mild to moderate asthma or other breathing problems
  • eye infections or irritation
  • flu or fever
  • severe sore throat or cough
  • skin rashes and infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration

What you can expect

No appointment is necessary — just walk in and explain your problem to the receptionist, and you’ll be assessed quickly for appropriate medical attention.

You can also expect to fill in a number of forms, so that the urgent care clinic staff have the information they need to assess and treat you appropriately. You’ll be asked questions about your current health issue, when it began, what it affects and how severe it is.

You’ll also be asked about your medical history — infections, long-term conditions, childhood illnesses and injuries, allergies and so on. This is critical to ensure you don’t get prescribed a medication you’re allergic to, or that may cause unforeseen side effects. You can also expect lower costs than in any emergency room.

What to bring

Preparing for your visit to the urgent care clinic can speed your assessment and reduce your stress. Before you leave, make sure you have:
  • a list of all medications you are currently taking
  • a list of medications that you need but don’t have
  • notes about symptoms and changes in your condition
  • a list of doctors and medical facilities you have been to before, including your primary care doctor or family doctor
  • a family member or trusted friend
  • questions to ask
  • health insurance form or card.

Before you leave

Ask the treating physician or the receptionist about any medication or treatment prescribed. Make sure you, or the person who came with you, understands how to take them.

Ask about any needed follow-up visits, treatments or tests. Make sure you get the place, date and time in writing.

Ask about referrals and information sent to your primary care doctor or specialists.

Knowledge is health

Different medical issues require the right approach. Learn when to choose between the emergency room and the urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah can make all the difference to your health.
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