Family Doctor 84093



We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

Besides individuals, our medical professionals also take care of your employees with their expertise in occupational medicine. We know all too well how time, money and productivity can be lost when one of your employees needs professional medical attention. Let us take proper care of your employees and your business with quick, efficient and thorough health services.

1950 East 7000 South , Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor 84093

Another great thing about having a family doctor is that she or he can save you money. Besides saving by using primary care, your family doctor can go a long way in cutting down your need for a trip to the emergency room, being admitted to the hospital or the need for surgery. Let us help you head unnecessary and avoidable medical as well as financial trouble off at the pass.

Another great thing about having a family doctor is that she or he can save you money. Besides saving by using primary care, your family doctor can go a long way in cutting down your need for a trip to the emergency room, being admitted to the hospital or the need for surgery. Let us help you head unnecessary and avoidable medical as well as financial trouble off at the pass.

We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Nausea
Family Doctor 84093
Family Doctor 84093
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City


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Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.


Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.


Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.


Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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What to expect from an urgent care clinic when you're suffering from an accident injury

An urgent care clinic is a specific form of medical facility, where you can find a range of medical services for illness and accident injury. However, not everyone is familiar with them, and don’t know what to expect, or how to decide whether to seek medical attention from their regular doctor, the emergency room or the urgent care clinic for an accident injury.

If you have an illness or accident injury, here is what you can expect to find at your urgent care clinic.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care clinics are intended for an illness or accident injury that is not life-threatening, but cannot wait overnight or until a primary care doctor is available. For example, strep throat or ear infections, dehydration, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, skin infections, allergic reactions to medication and non life-threating injuries.

The American Association of Urgent Care Medicine defines urgent care as “the provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and accident injury.” The AAUCM explains that urgent care does not replace either the emergency room, nor your primary care giver — your family doctor. The urgent care clinic is useful outside of regular office hours, or when your primary caregiver is away from their clinic.

How to choose the right type of care

It makes no sense to use a baseball bat to swat a fly. Treatment at a hospital’s emergency room (ER) can be very expensive, so they’re best reserved for truly life-threatening emergencies.

Choose the emergency room for severe situations:

  • compound fractures, especially where bone is exposed
  • convulsions or seizures
  • gunshot wounds or deep knife wounds
  • uncontrollable bleeding
  • moderate to severe (second to third-degree) burns
  • poisoning
  • severe abdominal pain
  • signs of heart attack or stroke
  • serious head, back or neck injuries
  • problems related to pregnancy

Is urgent care right for your accident injury?

These are for a medical issue that may not be an accident injury, but still needs treatment in less than 24 hours. Some examples include:

  • falls
  • cuts that require stitches to stop bleeding
  • mild to moderate asthma or other breathing problems
  • eye infections or irritation
  • flu or fever
  • severe sore throat or cough
  • skin rashes and infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration

What you can expect

No appointment is necessary — just walk in and explain your problem to the receptionist, and you’ll be assessed quickly for appropriate medical attention.

You can also expect to fill in a number of forms, so that the urgent care clinic staff have the information they need to assess and treat you appropriately. You’ll be asked questions about your current health issue, when it began, what it affects and how severe it is.

You’ll also be asked about your medical history — infections, long-term conditions, childhood illnesses and injuries, allergies and so on. This is critical to ensure you don’t get prescribed a medication you’re allergic to, or that may cause unforeseen side effects. You can also expect lower costs than in any emergency room.

What to bring

Preparing for your visit to the urgent care clinic can speed your assessment and reduce your stress. Before you leave, make sure you have:
  • a list of all medications you are currently taking
  • a list of medications that you need but don’t have
  • notes about symptoms and changes in your condition
  • a list of doctors and medical facilities you have been to before, including your primary care doctor or family doctor
  • a family member or trusted friend
  • questions to ask
  • health insurance form or card.

Before you leave

Ask the treating physician or the receptionist about any medication or treatment prescribed. Make sure you, or the person who came with you, understands how to take them.

Ask about any needed follow-up visits, treatments or tests. Make sure you get the place, date and time in writing.

Ask about referrals and information sent to your primary care doctor or specialists.

Knowledge is health

Different medical issues require the right approach. Learn when to choose between the emergency room and the urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah can make all the difference to your health.
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First aid before taking someone to the urgent care clinic

Spring is around the corner, and it’s time for people to get outside, clean up the lawn and garden and fix winter’s damage. It’s also a time when accidents and visits to the urgent care clinic spike: falls off ladders, sprains, cuts and sometimes serious injuries that may require professional treatment at an urgent care clinic.

Usually, these types of incidents require immediate treatment on the spot. Here are some first aid tips everyone should know to treat an accident victim before taking them to an urgent care clinic.

Cuts and wounds

A minor cut can usually be treated at home with a little soap and warm water and a bandage. But a major wound can require professional care.

How do you tell whether someone near year has a minor or major wound? There are clear signs. A scrape may ooze blood slowly, but a cut with flowing blood will need a trip to the urgent care clinic.

Remove any debris or foreign objects from the wound. If it’s a minor cut, wash gently with warm water and soap. Don’t apply disinfectant into the wound — that will only cause pain without having any benefit. If the victim is suffering a wound where the blood flow pulses, it’s an arterial cut, and potentially fatal.

Don’t hesitate. Remove any foreign objects or debris from the wound, and press a bandage, gauze or clean cloth against it. If you cannot find a clean cloth, use whatever’s at hand. Call for an ambulance and don’t move the victim.


There are three degrees of burns. A first-degree burn affects just the top layer of skin. You can tell it’s a first-degree burn when the skin is reddened and painful, but not blistered. As the skin heals, it can peel.

To treat first-degree burns, run cold water over the area to bring down the temperature. Make sure the affected area is clean, to avoid infection, but don’t wipe it with cotton balls. The little fibers can stick to the burned skin, encouraging infection.

Give the victim over-the-counter pain medication such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. You can apply anesthetic gel or cream to soothe the pain, and protect it with loose gauze.

Don’t apply ice because this can make the damage worse. Also avoid the legendary home remedies of butter or margarine to the wound. They just don’t do anything.

Seek professional medical care if the burn is larger than three inches across, or on the face, knee, foot, spine, or other major joint.

A second-degree burn penetrates beyond the top layer and causes blisters and thickening of the skin. The blisters can break, increasing the risk of infection.

To treat them, run cold water over the burn for at least 15 minutes to cool it. Administer over-the-counter pain relief, and apply antibiotic cream.

Take the victim to the urgent care clinic if the burn is large, or affects the face, hands, buttocks, groin or feet.

Third-degree burns penetrate through all layers of the skin. You can tell them by a waxy, white or a dark brown color, or charring of the skin, and a raised, leathery texture without blisters. These will cause severe scarring unless they receive medical treatment.

Do not try to treat a third-degree burn yourself. Call 911 immediately, then make sure there is no clothing sticking to the burn. Raise the injury over the level of the heart.


Falls from ladders, roofs and stairs can lead to sprains and breaks. A sprain is over-stretching, or tearing to a tendon or ligament, while a break is a fracture to bone. Both can cause swelling.

You can tell it’s a sprain when there is pain around the soft tissues, but not on the. Pain in the boney area of the ankle, for instance, indicates a break. A sure sign of a break is that the person is not able to put any weight on it.

The treatment is RICE: rest, ice, compression and elevation. Help the victim to rest comfortably. At least 24 hours of rest for the sprained joint is essential. Apply ice to reduce pain and swelling, but never apply ice directly to the skin — that hurts. Make an ice pack in a plastic bag, then wrap it in a towel to apply to the injury.

You can apply a compression bandage on a sprain, and then elevate the sprained joint above the level of the heart. You could put pillows under the foot as the victim lies on a bed or couch. Whether it’s a sprain or a break, you should take the victim to an urgent care clinic as quickly as possible.

Heart attack

Heart attacks are the cause of one in seven deaths in the United States. They’re caused by a blockage of arteries that lead to the heart. Symptoms include pressure, pain or squeezing sensation in the chest, back, jaw or neck; nausea, indigestion or abdominal pain; shortness of breath; cold sweat; fatigue; and light-headedness or sudden dizziness.

Symptoms can appear suddenly, but there are advance warnings days or weeks in advance, such as recurring chest pain that can be relieved by rest.

When you see someone with the signs of heart attack, call 911 immediately. Don’t hesitate. Start CPR — cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If the victim is conscious, take them to the urgent care centre or emergency room as quickly as possible.

Learn first aid, but just in case, an urgent care clinic is here for you

These are just a few tips for first aid everyone needs to know today. Use them to the best of your ability, and don’t hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.
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The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

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