Family Doctor 84070



We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

For some medical situations, you can’t wait several days before your doctor has an opening, and other situations aren’t dire enough to warrant a trip to the emergency room. For either situation, you might be better off going to a Utah urgent care clinic. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here to take care of your medical needs and do so in a way that’s efficient and affordable.

1950 East 7000 South , Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

Family Doctor 84070

We hope you’ll give us the honor of being your primary provider to keep you and your kids in excellent health. Your 84070 family doctor is instrumental in keeping you healthy and answering any questions you might have about your health or the health of your children. One of the best things about having a family doctor is they often treat their patients for decades, which you and your family are sure to enjoy.

We are proudly serving Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, West Valley City, and nearby cities. FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights handles Family Doctor, Medical Care and more.
Call us today at: 801-997-6116 for more information on products and services. Cold Treatment, Dehydration, Flu Treatment, Health Center
Family Doctor 84070
Family Doctor 84070
Urgent Care Clinic in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Family Doctor in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City and Medical Care in Salt Lake City Salt Lake City Sandy West Jordan West Valley City


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Back to school, back to health with your family doctor

The back-to-school season is too often also the back to the family doctor season. In schools today, children are often very close to each other, making it easy to spread germs that they can then bring back home and pass on to siblings and parents — often prompting a visit to the family doctor.

Here are some tips from your family doctor to protect your children’s health at school — and your own, as well. After all, your child's health is of utmost importance.

Make visiting your family doctor a health a routine

Starting a new school year means getting back to the old routine: getting up early, packing lunches, dressing properly, checking schedules and balancing school, work, after-school activities, social life, athletics and family time.

You can help strengthen your children’s and your whole family’s health by reinforcing healthy habits, too. Lead by example and encourage children to do simple but effective things like exercising regularly, getting outdoors often, eating healthy and getting enough sleep.


Immunizing your children is the best way to protect them against diseases that used to kill thousands of people: diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.

Making sure your own and your children’s vaccinations are complete and up to date also helps to protect the whole community against outbreaks.

And it protects the community, as well. There is no danger of your kids developing these diseases from the immunization.

Practice good hygiene

Frequent hand washing, sneezing into your elbow — build these habits at home so they carry over into the school.

Give your children hand sanitizer to take to school. Remind them to use it before eating lunch or snacks, and after using things that other people use, such as a water fountain, computer, or pencil sharpener.

Discourage children from sharing food, especially drinks with school friends to reduce spread of germs, as well as to avoid exposure to potential allergies.

Eat healthy

A healthy diet is one of the most effective ways to build up your whole family’s health. Make sure everyone gets plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. Your family doctor, as well as the US Department of Agriculture and the Harvard School of Public Health recommend that half of every meal should be fruits and vegetables. Medical studies suggest that we all eat 5 to 10 servings of fruit and vegetables a day. If that seems like a lot, remember that a single apple counts as two servings. Sprinkling berries onto breakfast cereal, adding a carrot and an apple to a school lunch, fruit for an after-school snack, and adding a salad along with a vegetable to dinner, plus fruit for dessert easily brings you to that level.

Instead of sugary treats and candies, pack fruits and vegetables your kids like to eat.

A recent study found that a large number of kids bring their lunches back home from school. Check to see whether your children are eating healthy, and find out why if they’re not.

Get enough sleep

Any family doctor will tell you that Americans don’t get enough sleep. This can be a problem, because lack of adequate sleep weakens the immune system, reduces kids’ ability to concentrate and think, inhibits performance in sports and other physical activities and contributes to obesity.

Children need more sleep than adults, as well:

  • Preschoolers —10 to 13 hours of sleep per day
  • School-aged children 6 to 13 years old — 9 to 11 hours
  • Teenagers 13–17 — 8 to 10 hours.

Exercise together

Make exercise and outdoor activities part of the family routine. Take regular family hikes or bike rides, participate in sports and keep in shape yourself. Setting the example for your kids is the best way to build a lifelong fitness habit.

Visit the family doctor

Even when you’re well, every member of the family should see the family doctor at least once a year for a check-up. Your family doctor can also ensure that the whole family’s immunizations are complete and up to date, and give you advice on any health-related issues.

And if you have any questions or concerns about your children’s or your own health, don’t hesitate to call your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, that's us, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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How to tell when your child needs an urgent care clinic

One of parents’ biggest concerns is the health of their children. So it's natural that many parents struggle with whether they should look after their children at home or take them into an urgent care clinic when they become sick or injured. The decision about whether to visit an urgent care clinic often comes down to the severity of the particular situation.

Children don’t usually become seriously ill without warning. Kids are resilient and often bounce back from illnesses, infections and injuries quickly. Yet parents know their children best, and they know when there is something seriously wrong. Parents are very capable of dealing with the most common minor infections and injuries their children suffer. Parents can usually manage minor scrapes and cuts, bruises and even colds and flus based on their knowledge, a little common sense and a lot of tender loving care. But parents need to know when they should seek the attention of an emergency room or urgent care clinic.

The rule of thumb is this: When a child has suffered an injury or illness that you think might threaten his or her long-term health or lead to permanent harm, it’s time to seek urgent care.

What is an emergency?

You need to take your child to an emergency room or an urgent care clinic immediately for any of these situations:

  • unconsciousness or unresponsiveness when spoken to
  • any loss of consciousness after a head injury, especially if it is accompanied by vomiting, disorientation, confusion or increasing pain
  • seizures, usually shown by rapid, rhythmic jerking or stiffness
  • trouble breathing
  • skin or lips that look blue, gray or purple
  • high fever with neck stiffness
  • pain that is persistent and severe or increasing
  • cuts to the head, abdomen or chest, or that are deep or large elsewhere on the body with extensive bleeding
  • bleeding that does not stop after applying pressure
  • a large burn, or a burn to the groin, face, feet, hands or chest
  • severe hand injuries, which can lead to permanent disability if untreated

Other situations requiring an urgent care clinic

Although it is rare for children to develop a severe illness without any warning signs, there are some symptoms that should alert parents to take their child to urgent care:

  • ear infections, sinus infections, pneumonia or bacterial bronchitis with a fever over 101 degrees for more than five days
  • wheezing with trouble breathing
  • rapid and labored breathing
  • extreme lethargy or uncharacteristic tiredness
  • any eye injuries
  • seeing bright, dark or cloudy areas
  • persistent chest pain
  • repeated vomiting
  • paralysis or weakness
  • testicular swelling or pain
  • change in skin tone
  • not drinking or passing urine, which can be signs of dehydration
  • persistent dizziness
  • flu symptoms that improve but then return with fever and a cough

Sports injuries

One of the most dangerous remedies to sports injuries is the phrase "walk it off." Parents of children who participate in high-energy sports such as soccer, hockey, football, track and even baseball need to be aware of common injuries that require a trip to urgent care.

A similar phrase is “no pain, no gain.” This is a myth, and it is especially dangerous for children. Head injuries are common in many sports, and parents as well as health care professionals now understand how hazardous they can be.

After a sports injury, watch for these symptoms:

  • head pain, dizziness or light-headedness, which can be signs of a concussion
  • limping or pain when putting weight on one foot, which can indicate a sprain
  • difficulty standing, sitting or moving normally
  • tingling, numbness or weakness in limbs, fingers or toes
  • sharp pain during physical activity
  • difficulty sleeping after activity, which can be another sign of concussion.

With any of these symptoms, take your child to an urgent care clinic.

When in doubt, err on the side of caution

Kids do recover quickly, but if you have any doubt or questions about the seriousness of an illness or injury, don’t hesitate to seek the services of an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Contact FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic for more information.

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What to expect from an urgent care clinic when you're suffering from an accident injury

An urgent care clinic is a specific form of medical facility, where you can find a range of medical services for illness and accident injury. However, not everyone is familiar with them, and don’t know what to expect, or how to decide whether to seek medical attention from their regular doctor, the emergency room or the urgent care clinic for an accident injury.

If you have an illness or accident injury, here is what you can expect to find at your urgent care clinic.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care clinics are intended for an illness or accident injury that is not life-threatening, but cannot wait overnight or until a primary care doctor is available. For example, strep throat or ear infections, dehydration, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, skin infections, allergic reactions to medication and non life-threating injuries.

The American Association of Urgent Care Medicine defines urgent care as “the provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and accident injury.” The AAUCM explains that urgent care does not replace either the emergency room, nor your primary care giver — your family doctor. The urgent care clinic is useful outside of regular office hours, or when your primary caregiver is away from their clinic.

How to choose the right type of care

It makes no sense to use a baseball bat to swat a fly. Treatment at a hospital’s emergency room (ER) can be very expensive, so they’re best reserved for truly life-threatening emergencies.

Choose the emergency room for severe situations:

  • compound fractures, especially where bone is exposed
  • convulsions or seizures
  • gunshot wounds or deep knife wounds
  • uncontrollable bleeding
  • moderate to severe (second to third-degree) burns
  • poisoning
  • severe abdominal pain
  • signs of heart attack or stroke
  • serious head, back or neck injuries
  • problems related to pregnancy

Is urgent care right for your accident injury?

These are for a medical issue that may not be an accident injury, but still needs treatment in less than 24 hours. Some examples include:

  • falls
  • cuts that require stitches to stop bleeding
  • mild to moderate asthma or other breathing problems
  • eye infections or irritation
  • flu or fever
  • severe sore throat or cough
  • skin rashes and infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration

What you can expect

No appointment is necessary — just walk in and explain your problem to the receptionist, and you’ll be assessed quickly for appropriate medical attention.

You can also expect to fill in a number of forms, so that the urgent care clinic staff have the information they need to assess and treat you appropriately. You’ll be asked questions about your current health issue, when it began, what it affects and how severe it is.

You’ll also be asked about your medical history — infections, long-term conditions, childhood illnesses and injuries, allergies and so on. This is critical to ensure you don’t get prescribed a medication you’re allergic to, or that may cause unforeseen side effects. You can also expect lower costs than in any emergency room.

What to bring

Preparing for your visit to the urgent care clinic can speed your assessment and reduce your stress. Before you leave, make sure you have:
  • a list of all medications you are currently taking
  • a list of medications that you need but don’t have
  • notes about symptoms and changes in your condition
  • a list of doctors and medical facilities you have been to before, including your primary care doctor or family doctor
  • a family member or trusted friend
  • questions to ask
  • health insurance form or card.

Before you leave

Ask the treating physician or the receptionist about any medication or treatment prescribed. Make sure you, or the person who came with you, understands how to take them.

Ask about any needed follow-up visits, treatments or tests. Make sure you get the place, date and time in writing.

Ask about referrals and information sent to your primary care doctor or specialists.

Knowledge is health

Different medical issues require the right approach. Learn when to choose between the emergency room and the urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah can make all the difference to your health.
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Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.


Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.


Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.


Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

CALLCall us 801-997-6116

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