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Urgent Care Clinic Salt Lake City




FIRSTMED URGENT CARE - COTTONWOOD HEIGHTS

SALT LAKE CITY UT

We are the premier urgent care and occupational medicine network in the Salt Lake Valley.

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CALLCall Us: 801-997-6116

About FirstMed Urgent Care - Cottonwood Heights

FirstMed is a locally owned and operated network of urgent care clinics providing medical services to residents on the Wasatch Front. We treat everything from sinus infections and flu to cuts requiring stitches and broken bones. All 5 of our convenient locations have x-ray and lab services to aid in the diagnosis and treatment when you are sick or injured.



1950 East 7000 South , Salt Lake City, UT 84121

  • Office Hours
  • Monday - Friday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Saturday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM
    Sunday 09:00 AM - 09:00 PM

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Work-related injuries that require emergency care

When should you take a co-worker to seek emergency care for a work-related injury? This past year, private industry employees suffered nearly 3 million non-fatal work-related injuries and illnesses in the U.S. That’s nearly 8,000 every day. Although the numbers of work-related injuries have been falling over the years, when it happens to you or a co-worker, you need to know how to respond.

Falls that involve a bump to the head, or heavy objects falling and striking the head, can lead to concussions. We are now becoming more aware of the serious, long-term and even life-threatening consequences of concussions. This is a major issue among work-related injuries. The following symptoms can be signs of a concussion immediately after a work-related injury. If a co-worker exhibits any of these, take him or her to receive emergency care.

  • confusion, agitation, restlessness
  • slurred speech, trouble walking or other signs of decreased coordination
  • weakness
  • numbness in the head or other parts of the body
  • severe or worsening headaches
  • vomiting
  • seizures
  • convulsions

Hand injuries

A shallow cut or a pinched finger might seem like nothing to worry about, but work-related injuries involving a hand can lead to life-long disability. Seek emergency care for any of these symptoms:

  • severe bleeding
  • numbness
  • loss of motion or strength
  • exposed bones or tendons.

Eye injuries

Most people will seek attention for an eye injury without question. But you do need professional medical attention if you see cloudy, dark or bright areas in your vision. These can be signs of serious and potentially permanent problems stemming from work-related injuries.

Lacerations

Cuts, scrapes and puncture wounds can lead to extreme bleeding and nerve damage. Some can be minor, but seek urgent care for any of these symptoms:

  • weakness or numbness
  • inability to move a finger or other injured area
  • pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, heart disease or circulation problems.

Also, you should seek urgent care for any work-related injuries involving puncture wounds or foreign materials or objects entering your body.

Trauma

Bone sprains and breaks require urgent care. For breaks, call 911 and immobilize the affected area. For ankle sprains, remember the RICE approach: rest, ice, compression and elevation.

  • Rest the ankle. Do not put any weight on it. Assist the injured person to a chair or safe area to rest, or to transportation to urgent care.
  • Ice. Apply an ice pack or even a bag of frozen peas or corn to the sprained ankle.
  • Compression. Use a compression bandage to help control swelling, and immobilize and support the ankle.
  • Elevation. Recline and raise the ankle above the waist.

Burns

Minor burns can usually be treated in the workplace or at home without professional care. More severe burns, and all chemical burns, require professional emergency care as quickly as possible. Quick action is important for any kind of burn. Immediately cool the burned area with cold water, ice or even snow. Give the victim a painkiller and apply a soothing cream or gel.

If the burn only appears as redness on the skin in a small area, it’s probably a first-degree burn, which usually heals within seven to 10 days. If the burn is to a large are of skin—more than 3 in. across—seek emergency care. More serious burns can result in blisters, which can pop and leak. It’s important to keep the burns clean to prevent infection. Immediately run cool water over the burned area for 15 minutes, take pain medication and apply an antibiotic cream. Don’t use cotton balls, as the thin fibers can stick to the wound and lead to infection.

Third-degree burns penetrate through the skin to the flesh, tendons and bones below. They can also cause extensive nerve damage. They’re distinguished by severe symptoms, such as waxy and white color, charring to the skin, a raised and leathery texture, and blisters that do not pop or heal. Call 911 immediately if you or a co-worker experiences a third-degree (or worse) burn, or any kind of chemical burn.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in Cottonwood Heights.

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The most common work-related injuries

You could need emergency care at work someday. Whether your work environment is an office, a manufacturing plant, a loading dock or even a car, work-related injuries are a real threat. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal work-related injuries in 2015 that required emergency care. That year, as many as 4,386 employers died on the job. That translates to 13 people who never came home from work at the end of every day in the U.S.

The most common work-related injuries are sprains and strains, cuts or punctures, bruises and fractures. The most common causes are related to carrying or moving materials, whether products, tools, or equipment.

The top 10 causes of reported workers’ compensation injuries in the U.S. are:

  1. Overexertion – from lifting, pulling, carrying, pushing or throwing things beyond a worker’s ability. These are the most expensive injury to treat, not only terms of emergency care and treatment costs but also in terms of fixing the root cause of the situation in the workplace to avoid work-related injuries.
  2. Slips and trips — on wet or slippery floors, or over something lying on the floor.
  3. Falling objects – from shelves or other elevated places, or dropped by another person. Trauma to the head, feet and legs are common, but many of these can be prevented with the use of proper personal protective gear, training and situational awareness of employees and supervisors.
  4. Walking into objects — such as a wall, door, furniture or equipment, leading to work-related injuries to the head, knee, neck and foot. Reducing these injuries requires situational awareness by employees, which can be improved through training, and also commitment by employers, managers and supervisors to keep the workplace free of hazards.
  5. Machine injuries — loose clothing, long hair, shoes and fingers are the most common things to get entangled in moving equipment. Proper installation of machinery and safety guards, as well as thorough worker training are essential to prevent work-related injuries.
  6. Vehicle accidents — these happen to employees who drive for work. Driver training and employer attention to ensuring work drivers adhere to driving laws and policies have been proven to reduce the incidence of accidents.
  7. Repetitive motion injuries these include carpal tunnel syndrome, wrist and hand injuries, and eye problems that result from doing the same activity for extended periods every day. Although these are chronic problems, they can lead to injuries requiring emergency care. Reducing repetitive-motion injuries requires good training of workers so they know how to avoid the motions and change the habits that lead to repetitive motion injuries. They must take proper breaks and use ergonomic equipment.
  8. Electrical shocks and burns from hot equipment as well as chemicals. Again, training and rigorous safety procedures in the workplace are essential to avoiding injuries that require emergency care.
  9. Falls from elevated positions such as a roof, stairs or a ladder are common causes of emergency-care visits. Employers can prevent these situations with proper protective equipment, worker training and employee attention to surroundings.
  10. Violence at the workplace — annually, employees are injured by violence inflicted by their fellow employees. Many of these incidents require emergency care. In 2015, there were more than 400 homicides in the workplace. Employers can reduce and prevent workplace violence by adopting zero-tolerance-for-violence policies, incorporating violence prevention into workplace health and safety training, and educating workers about their rights in the workplace.

Don’t delay emergency care

With work-related injuries, time is of the essence. Delaying professional treatment of cuts, burns, sprains, breaks, concussions and other injuries can lead to permanent problems. Seek emergency care right away. FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic can help.

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How to tell when your child needs an urgent care clinic

One of parents’ biggest concerns is the health of their children. So it's natural that many parents struggle with whether they should look after their children at home or take them into an urgent care clinic when they become sick or injured. The decision about whether to visit an urgent care clinic often comes down to the severity of the particular situation.

Children don’t usually become seriously ill without warning. Kids are resilient and often bounce back from illnesses, infections and injuries quickly. Yet parents know their children best, and they know when there is something seriously wrong. Parents are very capable of dealing with the most common minor infections and injuries their children suffer. Parents can usually manage minor scrapes and cuts, bruises and even colds and flus based on their knowledge, a little common sense and a lot of tender loving care. But parents need to know when they should seek the attention of an emergency room or urgent care clinic.

The rule of thumb is this: When a child has suffered an injury or illness that you think might threaten his or her long-term health or lead to permanent harm, it’s time to seek urgent care.

What is an emergency?

You need to take your child to an emergency room or an urgent care clinic immediately for any of these situations:

  • unconsciousness or unresponsiveness when spoken to
  • any loss of consciousness after a head injury, especially if it is accompanied by vomiting, disorientation, confusion or increasing pain
  • seizures, usually shown by rapid, rhythmic jerking or stiffness
  • trouble breathing
  • skin or lips that look blue, gray or purple
  • high fever with neck stiffness
  • pain that is persistent and severe or increasing
  • cuts to the head, abdomen or chest, or that are deep or large elsewhere on the body with extensive bleeding
  • bleeding that does not stop after applying pressure
  • a large burn, or a burn to the groin, face, feet, hands or chest
  • severe hand injuries, which can lead to permanent disability if untreated

Other situations requiring an urgent care clinic

Although it is rare for children to develop a severe illness without any warning signs, there are some symptoms that should alert parents to take their child to urgent care:

  • ear infections, sinus infections, pneumonia or bacterial bronchitis with a fever over 101 degrees for more than five days
  • wheezing with trouble breathing
  • rapid and labored breathing
  • extreme lethargy or uncharacteristic tiredness
  • any eye injuries
  • seeing bright, dark or cloudy areas
  • persistent chest pain
  • repeated vomiting
  • paralysis or weakness
  • testicular swelling or pain
  • change in skin tone
  • not drinking or passing urine, which can be signs of dehydration
  • persistent dizziness
  • flu symptoms that improve but then return with fever and a cough

Sports injuries

One of the most dangerous remedies to sports injuries is the phrase "walk it off." Parents of children who participate in high-energy sports such as soccer, hockey, football, track and even baseball need to be aware of common injuries that require a trip to urgent care.

A similar phrase is “no pain, no gain.” This is a myth, and it is especially dangerous for children. Head injuries are common in many sports, and parents as well as health care professionals now understand how hazardous they can be.

After a sports injury, watch for these symptoms:

  • head pain, dizziness or light-headedness, which can be signs of a concussion
  • limping or pain when putting weight on one foot, which can indicate a sprain
  • difficulty standing, sitting or moving normally
  • tingling, numbness or weakness in limbs, fingers or toes
  • sharp pain during physical activity
  • difficulty sleeping after activity, which can be another sign of concussion.

With any of these symptoms, take your child to an urgent care clinic.

When in doubt, err on the side of caution

Kids do recover quickly, but if you have any doubt or questions about the seriousness of an illness or injury, don’t hesitate to seek the services of an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Contact FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic for more information.

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Household injuries: When should you go to an urgent care clinic?

Most injuries happen at home, where we spend most of our time. Although most minor injuries do not lead to long-term harm and can easily be treated at home, many require a trip to an urgent care clinic. So how do you tell when you should rush to an urgent care clinic? Here are some things to look for in the most common household injuries.

Trips and falls are two kinds of injuries that can merit a visit to an urgent care clinic. With young children, falls are usually not harmful except to their pride. But as people get older, falls can lead to serious damage such as broken bones. Treat any bruising that results from a fall with a cold pack.

If a person who has fallen has pain in his or her ankle, it could be a sprain. Treat it with rest, ice (or a cold pack), compression and elevation. You can remember those steps with the acronym RICE. Do not let the patient walk or allow the injured ankle to bear any weight. Wrap an ice pack or cold pack in a towel or cloth and apply it to the injury. Wrap it gently to reduce swelling, and raise the ankle above the chest.

Seek attention at an urgent care clinic when:

  • you hear a popping sound when the sprain happens
  • the ankle is very unstable
  • there is moderate to severe pain, swelling, stiffness and bruising

Cuts

Bleeding can be frightening for children. Mop up blood with clean tissue or gauze, and apply pressure to the cut. When the bleeding stops, gently apply antiseptic to the area around the wound but not in the wound itself, as the latter can increase pain without healing the wound. Bandage the cut and monitor it for signs of infection such as swelling, redness or pus.

Go to an urgent care clinic or emergency room if:

  • bleeding does not stop after you apply pressure
  • there is swelling or the injury feels hot
  • there is an object inside the cut that you cannot remove

Stepping on a sharp object

Stepping on a nail, screw, thorn, splinter or other sharp object can lead to extensive bleeding and increase a person's risk for infection. Make sure there is nothing left in the wound or under the skin. If there is still a piece of the object in the foot, try prying it out with disinfected tweezers or a needle. Don’t use too much force, which can make the injury worse. Wash the foot with warm water and soap to prevent infection. Use antibacterial ointment or disinfectant, and bandage the wound.

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • you cannot remove the object or if there is still a piece lodged under your skin
  • you have stepped on a rusty nail or other object and have not had a tetanus vaccination in the past five years
  • the wound becomes more painful with time

Burns

In children under five, burns and scalds often are caused by hot drinks.

For older children and adults, several things around the house can cause burns. These include fireplaces, hot stoves and appliances including toasters and hair-curlers. Treat a burn by holding it under cold running water for 10 minutes. Apply an antiseptic pain-relieving lotion such as one with aloe vera. Then bandage the area gently.

Go to an emergency care clinic if:

  • the burn is bigger than your palm
  • there is blistering or swelling
  • the burn appears infected because it is red, raised or blistered.

Choking

Small children often put objects in their mouth that can be a choking hazard. Apply the Heimlich maneuver and, if you cannot dislodge the item, call 911.

Poisoning

Most poisoning in the home involves medicines, cosmetics and household-cleaning products. Keep any dangerous items safely stored and out of reach of children. If anyone swallows a poisonous product, call 911 or Poison Control, or get them to a clinic immediately.

Drowning

Young children can drown in shallow water. Supervise small children whenever they are near pools, ornamental garden ponds, fountains and even in the bathtub. If a person is not breathing, use artificial respiration immediately and ask someone to call 911 for you.

Bee stings

When bees sting, they leave the poison-filled stinger under the skin. Locate the stinger and remove it by scraping it with a blunt object such as a debit card. Scrape from above the wound to push it out and remove as much of the poison as possible. Do not use tweezers or fingernails, which can push more poison into the wound.

After you have removed the stinger, wash the area with water and soap, then place a cold compress on it. Give painkillers to the patient to prevent swelling. Raise the body part that has been stung to reduce swelling

Go to the urgent care clinic if:

  • the patient shows signs of allergies such as swelling, difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • the sting remains red and itchy for more than 48 hours

You can deal with most minor injuries around the house with common sense and some knowledge. Learn First Aid at your next opportunity because it can help save someone’s life. If you have any doubt about an injury in your home, don’t hesitate to seek help at our clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit us at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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First Aid tips to use before you reach an urgent care clinic

When people suffer a traumatic injury, getting them to the closest urgent care clinic is vital. But if you are on the scene with them, there are things you can do immediately to help before and during your trip to an urgent care clinic.

If there is a splinter or glass embedded in the skin or wound, first wash the area around the wound with soap and water. Sterilize a pair of tweezers with rubbing alcohol, then use them to slowly pull the object out. If there are several pieces of glass that you cannot remove, gently wrap the area with a clean cloth and go to an urgent care clinic or emergency department.

Press a clean cloth firmly on any bleeding wound and hold it in place until the blood flow stops. This can take from three minutes to 15 minutes. If you have time, clean the wound with lukewarm running water.

If the wound is the result of an animal scratch or bite, wash it gently with soap and rinse it with lukewarm water. Cover it with gauze or a bandage and head for the urgent care clinic.

Burns

Act quickly: Time is critical with burns. Immediately hold the burn under cool running water or, if it’s available, apply snow to the burn. Keep it under the water or snow until the pain subsides. Cover the burned area and any small blisters with gauze. Place tape or a bandage loosely over the wound. Go to the urgent care clinic if the burn is on the hands, face or genitals, or if it covers an area of the body larger than a quarter-inch.

For deep burns or a burn with a surface area of more than 10 percent of the body, call 911. Cover the victim with a blanket to prevent hypothermia until medical care arrives.

Insect bites and stings

Bees will leave part of their stinger under the skin. It must be removed immediately. Don’t use tweezers, which can squeeze more venom into the wound. Instead, hold a fingernail or, better yet, a credit card at an angle over the stinger. Gently scrape the stinger out without breaking it.

Go to an urgent care clinic if the victim begins to cough, has a hoarse voice or exhibits trouble breathing, develops hives or appears to have a swollen tongue or lips.

Eye injury

You should get to urgent care immediately if you have sustained a hit or a poke in the eye that causes severe pain, sensitivity to light, blurry vision or continuous tears.

If a chemical has been splashed onto the eye, hold the eyelids open and flush with lukewarm water. Call Poison Control.

Hold a cool, wet cloth over the eye as you go to urgent care.

Heart attack

Chest pain, pressure, breathing trouble, cold and sweaty skin, paleness and jaw pain are some signs of a heart attack. Yet there are also soft signs including mild, unfocused chest pain that comes and goes, or starts mild and gets stronger, as well as fatigue and flu-like symptoms.

If you have First Aid training, administer CPR. Perform chest compressions for 30 seconds, followed by two breaths of artificial respiration into the airway. Then continue the compressions. If you are not trained in CPR, compression-only CPR is acceptable as long as the victim has not used up all the oxygen in his or her bloodstream.

Any heart attack requires immediate medical treatment. Call 911 or, if it’s safe, take the victim to the nearest emergency room or urgent care.

Be prepared

You never know when a emergency might happen, so be ready to react quickly with a home First Aid kit. It should contain:

  • emergency telephone numbers — not just 911, but also numbers for your local poison control center, emergency management office and family doctors. Also include home and work numbers for family, friends or neighbors who can help in an emergency. For example, if you have children, it's important to include numbers of people who can look after them in the event you have to take another family member to urgent care.
  • sterile gauze pads or dressings of various sizes
  • adhesive tape
  • bandages
  • antiseptic wipes or fluid
  • eye patches
  • thermometer
  • face shield or pocket mask
  • cloth to make an arm sling
  • scissors
  • tweezers
  • safety pins
  • instant ice packs
  • disposable, non-latex surgical or examination gloves
  • a First Aid manual

Be prepared to take those first steps when an emergency strikes. Then seek professional medical care at FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic, a top urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah.

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Create a temporary urgent care clinic in the wilderness

Can you take an urgent care clinic into the wild? The great outdoors is one of the best attributes of life in Utah. But when you’re out enjoying the fresh air and breathtaking vistas, you have to be ready for any emergency. What do you do when you need the services of an urgent care clinic yet are miles away from civilization?

Many of us enjoy hiking, running, canoeing or kayaking, camping and many other ways of communing with our natural environment. And as beneficial as those activities are for our physical and mental health, problems can arise. When you are several hours away from an urgent care clinic, you have to be prepared to take steps yourself.

The most common outdoor injuries include:

  • burns
  • cuts
  • blisters
  • dehydration
  • heat exhaustion
  • hypothermia and frostbite
  • allergic reactions
  • insect and animal bites
  • sprains
  • broken bones

If you’re facing an emergency far from an urgent care clinic or first-aid facility, the most important thing to remember is wilderness first aid. You have to be ready to stabilize the patient until you can get to professional emergency medical help.

Be prepared

As the Boy Scouts like to say: Be prepared. Before you leave on your journey into the wilderness, pack a fully stocked first-aid kit including bandages, sterile gauze, adhesive tape, scissors, tweezers, pain-killers, antiseptic wipes or soap, disposable non-latex gloves, a barrier device such as a face shield or mask, and phone numbers for poison control and emergency response.

Tell someone where you plan to go, when you’re leaving and when you plan to return.

Avoid emergencies

The best emergency-care strategy is to avoid having to go to an urgent care clinic. Planning can make the difference. On a long hike, make sure you bring enough water and easy-to-carry food such as granola bars, nuts, chocolate and other energy-dense snacks. To avoid dehydration and heat stroke, make sure everyone in your party drinks plenty of water. The hotter the day and the more strenuous the walk, the more water everyone will need.

Wearing the right clothing. Remember that footwear is also important. Dress to match the weather. If you’re going out in cold weather or into high elevations where cold is a concern, bring warm and waterproof clothing.

Dress in layers. If temperatures are higher than you expect, you can always remove layers.

Wilderness first-aid tips

In an emergency situation when you’re the only one able to respond, think like a first responder. Remember the basic three phases of wilderness first aid:

  1. Assess the situation. Is the patient in imminent danger of further harm? Would helping him or her put a responder in harm's way? Is the situation stable? For example, slipping and falling is an imminent danger on a steep slope. A patient in a river is in danger of drowning, and the same risk faces anyone who enters the water to help.
  2. Treat the emergency. When you have determined that a situation is stable, treat the injury. Foot blisters can be treated relatively easily, for example. You can find a safe place to sit, assess the injury and apply the appropriate treatment.
  3. Get the patient to emergency medical care. Only after a patient is stabilized should you move him or her. Consider the patient’s state. Can he or she walk with help? You will have to assess the circumstances carefully to determine whether you can take the patient out of the situation to an urgent care clinic or whether you need to call for an emergency response evacuation.

Administer pain killers such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In the event of an upper-body injury, the patient can often be evacuated by his or her companions. Before moving the patient, though, make sure any breaks are stabilized. For broken or sprained arms, use a sling to tie the arm close to the body so that it moves as little as possible.

When broken or sprained legs are involved, the best response often is to wait for emergency evacuation to an urgent care clinic. If that’s not possible, stabilize the injury using splints to reduce movement and pain.

Whether you wait for evacuation or do it yourself, being prepared with the right clothing, first-aid supplies and, most importantly, knowledge. If you need expert medical care, take your patient to FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic in West Valley Utah.

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Insights from an urgent care clinic: What to do when you get burned

Burns are one of the most common injuries that require attention at an urgent care clinic. If you or someone close to you suffers a burn, there are things you can do to help before you get them to the nearest urgent care clinic.

Many different things can cause burns, including campfires, household appliances and the sun. In addition to causing pain, burns can lead to infection or, in a worst-case scenario, death. An urgent care clinic can help you assess damage quickly.

Speed is essential in dealing with burns, and so is knowledge. Even before you head to a clinic, you can act immediately to reduce injury, relieve pain, speed healing and promote full recovery.

The first thing to do to treat a burn is to remove the heat source. Identify the probable cause of the burn and act accordingly: Take the hand away from the stove or the fire, remove the hot object or get the person out of the sun.

Urgent care clinic tips: Cool down

Burns continue to damage tissue even after the heat source is removed. As quickly as possible, put the burned area into cold running water or snow, if it’s available. Run cold water over the burn for 10 to 15 minutes, and keep the burn cool for an hour. You can wrap it loosely in a cool, wet bandanna or other cloth.

Do not use ice or ice water because it can lead to further tissue damage.

Take off jewelry or clothing that could constrict the area if it swells.

Evaluate

How bad is the burn? Burns are classified into three categories: first-, second- and third-degree.

  • First-degree burns are the mildest or least damaging. They cause pain and reddening of the skin.
  • Second-degree burns penetrate to the lower layers of skin and are distinguished by pain, redness, swelling and blistering.
  • Third-degree burns penetrate deep into muscle tissue. If the burned area appears white or blackened and charred, and the burned area is numb, it’s probably a third-degree burn.

Burns can also cause shock. If a burned person appears pale, disoriented and weak, and has clammy skin, bluish lips and fingernails, they are probably in shock.

Treat

After cooling the burned area, determine how to treat the injury depending on the type and degree of the burn.

The first thing to do is to clean the burn wound. Gently wash the burned area with clean, clear water, and pat it dry with a clean cloth or gauze. Be forewarned: washing might remove some burned skin.

  • Treat first-degree burns with skin-care products, such as aloe vera cream or an antibiotic ointment. Give the patient pain medication, such as aspirin or acetaminophen.
  • Second-degree burns might require treatment by an urgent care clinic or physician. After the burned area is cleaned, check for blisters. If the burned skin or blisters are not broken, the patient might not need a bandage. Yet if the burned skin or unbroken blisters will be exposed to dirt, or could be irritated by clothing, the patient will need a bandage.
  • Whenever blisters burst or the skin cracks, that part of the body is vulnerable to infection. Cover with a bandage, possibly one treated with antibiotic ointment. Replace it with a clean bandage whenever it gets wet or dirty.
  • Wrap the burn loosely so you don’t put pressure on the injured area, and never wrap tape or a bandage all the way around a burned hand, arm or leg. That can cause swelling, which can be painful. If the bandage sticks to the burn, soak it in warm water. Use a non-stick dressing if possible.
  • Third-degree burns require the attention of an urgent care clinic or physician. A patient with large burns might require intravenous antibiotics or fluids to replace body fluid lost during the burn. If the burn is over a large part of the body, the patient might need skin grafts or synthetic skin, all of which requires the attention of a medical specialist.

When in doubt about the seriousness of a burn or any kind of injury, don’t hesitate to go to a clinic immediately.

Manage pain

Pain from a burn can be intense, and it last a long time. Follow-up treatments of burns, even changing bandages and dressings, can cause more pain. Pain management is a critical part of treating a burn, starting with first aid and a visit to your local clinic.

Administer immediate pain relief with aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen. A clinic or physician might also prescribe stronger prescription pain relief.

As your premier urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic will help you manage pain and recover as quickly as possible from burns.

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Urgent care clinic tips: Summertime medical care

Summer is a time for family fun outdoors, but urgent care clinic doctors know it’s also the busy season for treating a range of accidental injuries. Here are some of the most common summertime health issues your local doctor will most likely treat several times this summer.

First on the list for your local urgent care clinic are heat stroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Many of us love hot weather for days at the beach, hiking in the woods or playing sports outdoors. But if you or someone near you shows signs of confusion, a change in mental status, has stopped sweating and their skin is hot and red, they might be suffering from heat stroke. If they experience muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness but are not confused and their skin is cool and moist, they could have heat exhaustion. Extreme thirst, dry mouth, swollen tongue, muscle weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness and even fainting are signs of dehydration. An urgent care clinic can help provide rapid treatment.

Before arriving at urgent care, get the person out of the heat and into an air-conditioned building. Give them a drink of something non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated.

Advice from an urgent care clinic: Sunburn treatment

You might think of sunburns as the price of a beautiful summer day. But sunburns can cause intense pain and long-term impacts. Studies have linked some types of skin cancer to frequent sunburns.

Sunburn can also cause damage to deeper tissues. Avoid it by wearing a hat and sunglasses. Don't expose yourself to direct sunlight during the brightest, hottest part of the day. Use a sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB radiation, and apply it every 90 minutes you are out in the sun. If you do get burned, soak a cloth in an equal mix of whole milk and water, and dab the mixture on the affected area.

If the burn blisters or becomes numb to the touch, see your family doctor.

Other burns

Burns also extend to those from campfires, barbecue grills and fireworks. In the U.S., fire departments respond to over 8,000 fires every year involving barbecues or grills. Improper use of grills and fires can also lead to smoke inhalation and asphyxiation.

You can treat minor burns by running cold water over the affected area. But if the burn is deep or covers a large area, or it is on your hands or face, it's critical to get the person to urgent care.

Stings and bites

Mosquito bites can be itchy and irritating, but increasingly they also transmit serious illnesses such as West Nile Virus. Ticks can spread Lime disease. Stings from bees, hornets and wasps can be painful and even life-threatening for people with allergies.

If you suspect an insect sting or bite might be causing further problems, see your family doctor.

Poisonous plants

Contact with plants like poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac can cause irritating, itchy skin rashes. Most of the time, they can be treated with over-the-counter antihistamines and lotions. However, seek medical attention if the affected area becomes swollen and painful.

Food poisoning

Undercooking meat on the grill and foods such as eggs and mayonnaise, which can spoil in the heat, can lead to food poisoning. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. If these symptoms persist, lead to dehydration or bleeding, see your family doctor or, in extreme cases, an urgent care clinic.

Falls

Playgrounds, hiking trails and even the backyard deck can be sites for falls. Your family doctor often treats sprains, strains, lacerations and fractures that happen at favorite summertime places.

Collisions

Summer is the season to enjoy bicycles, scooters, skateboards, ATVs, dirt bikes and other motorized vehicles, and occasionally accidents happen. Even an unfortunate encounter with a golf cart can result in lacerations, fractures, concussions or trauma.

Drowning

Drowning is the second-leading cause of death in children under 5 in the U.S. Enroll children in swimming and water-safety lessons as early as possible, and stay within arm’s reach of young children when swimming. Always wear approved personal flotation devices when boating. Learn CPR. If you or someone you love suffers a near-drowning accident, head straight to an urgent care clinic.

Enjoy your summer

Prevention is the first step to having a great summer season. Wear a hat, use sunscreen and drink plenty of water in hot weather. Apply insect repellent when outdoors. Use personal flotation devices and stay close to children around water. Wear helmets and other protective gear when bicycling and playing sports, and use caution with motorized vehicles.

If accidents happen, don't hesitate to seek an urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah. Visit FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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What to expect from an urgent care clinic when you're suffering from an accident injury

An urgent care clinic is a specific form of medical facility, where you can find a range of medical services for illness and accident injury. However, not everyone is familiar with them, and don’t know what to expect, or how to decide whether to seek medical attention from their regular doctor, the emergency room or the urgent care clinic for an accident injury.

If you have an illness or accident injury, here is what you can expect to find at your urgent care clinic.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care clinics are intended for an illness or accident injury that is not life-threatening, but cannot wait overnight or until a primary care doctor is available. For example, strep throat or ear infections, dehydration, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, skin infections, allergic reactions to medication and non life-threating injuries.

The American Association of Urgent Care Medicine defines urgent care as “the provision of immediate medical service offering outpatient care for the treatment of acute and chronic illness and accident injury.” The AAUCM explains that urgent care does not replace either the emergency room, nor your primary care giver — your family doctor. The urgent care clinic is useful outside of regular office hours, or when your primary caregiver is away from their clinic.

How to choose the right type of care

It makes no sense to use a baseball bat to swat a fly. Treatment at a hospital’s emergency room (ER) can be very expensive, so they’re best reserved for truly life-threatening emergencies.

Choose the emergency room for severe situations:

  • compound fractures, especially where bone is exposed
  • convulsions or seizures
  • gunshot wounds or deep knife wounds
  • uncontrollable bleeding
  • moderate to severe (second to third-degree) burns
  • poisoning
  • severe abdominal pain
  • signs of heart attack or stroke
  • serious head, back or neck injuries
  • problems related to pregnancy

Is urgent care right for your accident injury?

These are for a medical issue that may not be an accident injury, but still needs treatment in less than 24 hours. Some examples include:

  • falls
  • cuts that require stitches to stop bleeding
  • mild to moderate asthma or other breathing problems
  • eye infections or irritation
  • flu or fever
  • severe sore throat or cough
  • skin rashes and infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration

What you can expect

No appointment is necessary — just walk in and explain your problem to the receptionist, and you’ll be assessed quickly for appropriate medical attention.

You can also expect to fill in a number of forms, so that the urgent care clinic staff have the information they need to assess and treat you appropriately. You’ll be asked questions about your current health issue, when it began, what it affects and how severe it is.

You’ll also be asked about your medical history — infections, long-term conditions, childhood illnesses and injuries, allergies and so on. This is critical to ensure you don’t get prescribed a medication you’re allergic to, or that may cause unforeseen side effects. You can also expect lower costs than in any emergency room.

What to bring

Preparing for your visit to the urgent care clinic can speed your assessment and reduce your stress. Before you leave, make sure you have:
  • a list of all medications you are currently taking
  • a list of medications that you need but don’t have
  • notes about symptoms and changes in your condition
  • a list of doctors and medical facilities you have been to before, including your primary care doctor or family doctor
  • a family member or trusted friend
  • questions to ask
  • health insurance form or card.

Before you leave

Ask the treating physician or the receptionist about any medication or treatment prescribed. Make sure you, or the person who came with you, understands how to take them.

Ask about any needed follow-up visits, treatments or tests. Make sure you get the place, date and time in writing.

Ask about referrals and information sent to your primary care doctor or specialists.

Knowledge is health

Different medical issues require the right approach. Learn when to choose between the emergency room and the urgent care clinic in West Valley Utah can make all the difference to your health.
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Back to school, back to health with your family doctor

The back-to-school season is too often also the back to the family doctor season. In schools today, children are often very close to each other, making it easy to spread germs that they can then bring back home and pass on to siblings and parents — often prompting a visit to the family doctor.

Here are some tips from your family doctor to protect your children’s health at school — and your own, as well. After all, your child's health is of utmost importance.

Make visiting your family doctor a health a routine

Starting a new school year means getting back to the old routine: getting up early, packing lunches, dressing properly, checking schedules and balancing school, work, after-school activities, social life, athletics and family time.

You can help strengthen your children’s and your whole family’s health by reinforcing healthy habits, too. Lead by example and encourage children to do simple but effective things like exercising regularly, getting outdoors often, eating healthy and getting enough sleep.

Vaccinate

Immunizing your children is the best way to protect them against diseases that used to kill thousands of people: diphtheria, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis, whooping cough, and tuberculosis.

Making sure your own and your children’s vaccinations are complete and up to date also helps to protect the whole community against outbreaks.

And it protects the community, as well. There is no danger of your kids developing these diseases from the immunization.

Practice good hygiene

Frequent hand washing, sneezing into your elbow — build these habits at home so they carry over into the school.

Give your children hand sanitizer to take to school. Remind them to use it before eating lunch or snacks, and after using things that other people use, such as a water fountain, computer, or pencil sharpener.

Discourage children from sharing food, especially drinks with school friends to reduce spread of germs, as well as to avoid exposure to potential allergies.

Eat healthy

A healthy diet is one of the most effective ways to build up your whole family’s health. Make sure everyone gets plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. Your family doctor, as well as the US Department of Agriculture and the Harvard School of Public Health recommend that half of every meal should be fruits and vegetables. Medical studies suggest that we all eat 5 to 10 servings of fruit and vegetables a day. If that seems like a lot, remember that a single apple counts as two servings. Sprinkling berries onto breakfast cereal, adding a carrot and an apple to a school lunch, fruit for an after-school snack, and adding a salad along with a vegetable to dinner, plus fruit for dessert easily brings you to that level.

Instead of sugary treats and candies, pack fruits and vegetables your kids like to eat.

A recent study found that a large number of kids bring their lunches back home from school. Check to see whether your children are eating healthy, and find out why if they’re not.

Get enough sleep

Any family doctor will tell you that Americans don’t get enough sleep. This can be a problem, because lack of adequate sleep weakens the immune system, reduces kids’ ability to concentrate and think, inhibits performance in sports and other physical activities and contributes to obesity.

Children need more sleep than adults, as well:

  • Preschoolers —10 to 13 hours of sleep per day
  • School-aged children 6 to 13 years old — 9 to 11 hours
  • Teenagers 13–17 — 8 to 10 hours.

Exercise together

Make exercise and outdoor activities part of the family routine. Take regular family hikes or bike rides, participate in sports and keep in shape yourself. Setting the example for your kids is the best way to build a lifelong fitness habit.

Visit the family doctor

Even when you’re well, every member of the family should see the family doctor at least once a year for a check-up. Your family doctor can also ensure that the whole family’s immunizations are complete and up to date, and give you advice on any health-related issues.

And if you have any questions or concerns about your children’s or your own health, don’t hesitate to call your family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, that's us, FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic.

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Taking extra care with cleaning supplies around the house

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure is something no one wants to hear at the urgent care clinic. In fact, few people ever want to be in an urgent care clinic. The trouble is, many of the problems that an these clinics treat could be avoided with some knowledge and a little bit of planning.

Feel like a trip to urgent care clinic might be just around the corner? Here are some tips to help you make your home safer and your family less accident prone.

Avoid the urgent care clinic: keep hazards out of children’s reach

Many cleaning supplies can be hazardous if swallowed. With many, even accident skin contact will require a trip to the urgent care clinic. Install childproof locks on kitchen and laundry room cupboards where you store these. Install locks on medicine cabinets in your bathroom, as well.

Make sure your medicines and prescriptions are properly labelled, too. Try to keep your prescriptions in the containers they came in, so no one mistakes them for something harmless. This also applies to cleaning supplies like bleach and ammonia.

Don’t forget cleaning supplies you keep outside, or in a tool shed or garage. Windshield wiper fluid, pool cleansers and pesticides can be extremely dangerous if not handled properly.

Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen The kitchen is where most home fires can start. Never leave pans unattended when deep-frying, and watch out for overheating. Keep a home fire extinguisher that’s appropriate for grease fires in easy reach, and make sure that you know how to use it.

Make sure that your home is equipped with enough smoke alarms — at least one for every floor, set where smoke rises. Check them regularly to ensure they work and replace the batteries twice a year.

Install a carbon monoxide detector

Unfortunately, carbon monoxide poisoning cases are all too frequent at an urgent care center. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and deadly gas — that’s why it’s called the “silent killer.” Install a carbon monoxide detector in your home, and regularly check that it’s working.

Remove slip and trip hazards

An area rug that slides on a hardwood or tile floor is an accident that’s just begging to happen. Secure it in place with non-slip carpet tabs or double-sided carpet tape.

Don’t string long extension cords across rooms, even along the wall. In heavy traffic areas like recreation rooms, family rooms and hallways, they can tangle feet. Even a bedroom is a bad place for an extension cord, because it’s hard to see them in the dark, such as when you wake up in the middle of the night to attend to a crying child, for instance.

Clean spills immediately

Water, grease or any liquid is a major slip hazard. Clean up all spills immediately to avoid falls.

Keep stairs clear

Storing items on a stair, even temporarily, is another tripping hazard. A fall down just five stairs required a trip to the urgent care clinic for this writer.

A light at both the bottom and the top of the stairs will help your family avoid any tripping hazards.

Put away tools

Making sure tools are in their proper place can prevent accidents for not only children, but adults as well. A major cause of trips to the urgent care clinic is something heavy falling from a height — such as a hammer hung on an insecure pegboard.

Keep a well-stocked first aid kit

Accidents do happen, even when you take measures to prevent them. Having a first-aid kit — or more than one — will ensure you’re ready to respond when needed. You can have one for the house, and another for each vehicle.

It should include:

  • a list of emergency phone numbers, including poison control, family doctor and your pharmacist
  • a first-aid manual with clear, easy to understand instructions
  • disposable gloves — choose vinyl if you or someone in your family is allergic to latex
  • digital thermometer
  • bandages of different sizes
  • a roll of gauze or gauze pads
  • adhesive tape
  • disinfectant
  • antibiotic ointment
  • antibacterial wipes or cleaner
  • pain reliever such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
  • antihistamine tablets or liquid for allergic reactions
  • hydrocortisone cream for rashes
  • a one- to three-day supply of any medications you take regularly.

The safe home

People who work in an urgent care center in West Valley Utah have seen plenty of injuries that could easily be avoided. Take some time to prevent pain and anguish for you and your family. Otherwise, urgent care awaits.

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The difference between urgent care and the emergency room

It’s late on a weekend night. The stores and the doctor’s office are long closed, then someone you love cuts themselves deeply, or trips and sprains their ankle. Or perhaps your baby gets a sudden, high fever. They need medical care — but do they need to go to the local hospital emergency room, with its long wait times, or the urgentcare clinic?

Knowing what urgent care is and what its strengths are will help you make that crucial decision between urgent care and emergency medical care. When the health of you or your family is at stake, understanding the differences in facility care types is critical.

What is urgent care?

Urgent care is another term for urgent care. It’s a place where you can get immediate medical attention for an illness or injury when your family physician’s office is closed, during weekends, evenings and holidays.

Hospital emergency rooms are often crowded with people who do not need the full range of health and emergency resources available there. urgent care is the right choice when you or someone you know needs immediate medical attention for an issue that is serious, but not life-threatening. Turning to urgent care allows the emergency room to devote its resources to the people who need them most.

Many people feel confused by the difference between emergency care and urgent care. Both refer to issues that need attention quickly. But there are clear distinctions between the two.

Hospital emergency rooms are set up and staffed for the most complex and critical situations, including life-threatening situations like trauma from a car accident, heart attack or stroke.

Urgent care clinics or urgent care clinics are for illnesses or injuries you would normally take to your primary health care provider, when they’re available. These include:

  • -injuries from falls;
  • -minor bone fractures, such as in fingers or toes;
  • -cuts that are not bleeding heavily, but still require stitches to close;
  • -sprains and strains;
  • -fever or flu;
  • -infections;
  • -vomiting, diarrhea or dehydration;
  • -eye irritation;
  • -mild breathing difficulties, such as caused by asthma;
  • -severe sore throat or cough;
  • -skin rashes, and;
  • -urinary tract infections.

When to go to the hospital emergency department

Although an urgent care facility can handle some of the following, hospital emergency rooms are well-equipped to treat:

  • -symptoms of heart attack, which are chest pain that lasts longer than two minutes accompanied by difficulty breathing;
  • -symptoms of stroke, which are loss of vision, sudden numbness, muscle weakness, slurred speech or confusion;
  • -serious head injury;
  • -compound bone fractures — where the bone protrudes through the skin;
  • -moderate to serious burns;
  • -heavy, uncontrollable bleeding;
  • -fevers in newborns under three months old;
  • -poisoning;
  • -severe abdominal pain;
  • -difficulty breathing, and;
  • -suicidal feelings.

Urgent care clinics can set smaller bones, such as fingers and toes, stitch deep cuts and provide counselling.

There is one other important difference that impacts nearly everyone, no matter the type of care they are getting, and that's the cost. While averages can vary widely, hospital emergency room services are always much more expensive than urgent care clinics — up to seven times more.

What to bring with you

You can prepare for emergencies, whether they require urgent care or the hospital emergency room by keeping lists of the medical profile of each person in your household. This should include:

  • -all allergies and long-term medical conditions;
  • -all surgeries and other major medical treatments they’ve had, and;
  • -all medications they take, including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins and supplements.

Urgent care providers need this information to make the right diagnosis and prescribe appropriate treatment. Having it ready to go when an urgent health issue arises can save precious seconds, seconds that might make a difference.

We’re here for you

Don't ever forget that FirstMed Urgent Care Clinic is here for you when you need urgent care in West Jordan Utah.

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How to talk to your family doctor

A visit to the family doctor can be stressful. You’re not feeling well, you may be worried about your symptoms or those of a loved one, and doctors are so busy with other patients, they can’t always devote a lot of time to you. This all means there are steps you should take to make sure you get the most out of your time with the family doctor.

Before your appointment, write down a list of all your symptoms along with any questions you’d like to ask your family doctor. Also write down all the medications you take, including the amount, doses, how often you take it. Don’t leave out non-prescription medications, such as over-the-counter pain killers, supplements and vitamins. Include information about any side-effects, such as whether medication makes you feel sleepy or nauseous.

If you’re dealing with a long-term issue, think about keeping a “health journal.” Write down each day your symptoms, how you feel, how you sleep at night, medications you take and the food you eat. Include information about your life, such as major events, changes, sources of stress. Take it with you to your appointment.

At your appointment

If you feel you need someone to help, bring an interpreter or supportive family member or friend. Even if your English is fluent, it’s often helpful just to have that moral support.

Plan your time, and arrive on time for your appointment. Arriving late means you may get less time face-to-face with your family doctor.

Don’t let embarrassment keep you from describing your symptoms — your family doctor needs all the information you have to be able to assess the issue and prescribe the right way to treat it. Include your emotional and spiritual concerns: how does this health issue or a prescribed treatment make you feel? Often it helps just to be able to talk about these issues.

Tell your family doctor about your hopes for the future. What is important to you — playing sports, spending more time with family, taking a trip? What are your worries about the future?

During the appointment take notes, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you.

Before you leave

Before the appointment is over, review your notes and repeat the family doctor’s prescribed treatment and suggestions the way you understand. Make sure it’s clear to you.

Ask questions about anything you don’t understand about causes and symptoms.

    -

  • What is the treatment, exactly? If it’s medication, how strong is it? Exactly when and how should you take it — with food, on an empty stomach, in the morning or before bed?
  • -

  • Are there any choices or alternative treatments? Why did the family doctor choose this prescription? What are the pros and cons of each, such as possible complications or side effects?
  • -

  • Is there anything you need to avoid while taking the prescription or following the treatment? For example, should you abstain from alcohol while taking a new medication, or avoid certain activities? Are there any changes or accommodations you should ask your employer for while you are taking this treatment?
  • -

  • What should you do if you have side effects or complications?
  • -

  • How long do you need to take the prescription or treatment? Can you stop when your symptoms go away?
  • -

  • Best way and time to contact the family doctor or the office with follow-up questions, or to advise them of changes in your symptoms, side-effects or complications? Can you telephone or email?
  • -

  • What are the next steps: tests, appointments with specialists, follow-up appointments?

Next steps

Remember that nurses at the clinic, and pharmacists, are also excellent sources of information.

As an urgent care clinic and family doctor in Salt Lake City Utah, FirstMed is always available to help you with any medical concerns.

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Tips for avoiding workplace injuries that will land you in urgent care

During the working day, many cases arriving at an urgent care clinic are workers who are injured on the job. Despite an increased focus on workplace safety, millions of American workers are injured on the job every year, and nearly 900,000 injuries on the work site that required the employee to take time off work.

The tragedy of workplace injuries is not just the required trip to urgent care; it’s that many are preventable. Knowing where the hazards are and some simple tips can help you avoid a trip from the workplace to the urgent care clinic.

What drives workers to urgent care

The most frequent causes of workplace injuries seem commonplace: slips, trips and falls, being struck by an object or equipment, and overexertion. These may seem innocuous, but in a manufacturing operation, they can be serious enough to send the injured employee to the urgent care clinic.

Workplace injuries can also be costly for the employer, with serious impacts on productivity. The U.S. Department of Labor reported 2.9 million workplace injuries and illnesses in private industry in 2016. While this is down by 48,000 compared to the previous year, it’s still a lot of pain and suffering, and cost. Injuries in the manufacturing industry led to a median of nine work days before the injured worker could return to the job. In the meantime, the employer either loses the productivity of that employee, or must scramble to find someone else to fill in.

They can be even more serious. In 2016, 991 workers in private construction businesses were killed as a result of workplace injuries. Again, the main causes were falls and being struck by an object. In construction, the next leading cause of death on the work site was electrocution, followed by being caught/in-between. According to the Department of Labor, eliminating these “fatal four” causes could save more than 600 lives every year.

Tips to avoid workplace injuries

The first step is to know the hazards of your workplace. When you start on the job, familiarize yourself with the work site, noting the location of all equipment, high racks, stairs, steps and any other hazards.

Point out possible hazards or causes of accidents to management, such as a worn cable, strap or safety guard on equipment. Broken windows or spilled liquids may seem like something that can be fixed later — until someone gets injured.

Materials lying on the floor, requiring employees to step over them, may not seem like a serious issue — until an employee trips and sprains an ankle, required several days off work. Stay alert on the job. Statistics show that most of the workers who suffer accidents on the job are tired or sleepy.

Employers in manufacturing and construction are required by law to provide safety training to all employees, full-time and part-time. Follow all the safety rules, guidelines and posters. Do not take shortcuts or avoid wearing safety harnesses and gear. This includes hard hats, safety goggles, gloves, face masks, safety shoes and earplugs.

Never take on a high-risk job you have not been trained for. This exposes you to risk unnecessarily. Never over-reach for a tool, equipment or materials. If you need to strain to reach or lift something, stop and move, or use lifting equipment.

When picking up a heavy object, bend with your knees and lift with your legs, and not your back. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or equipment if it’s too heavy.

If you need urgent care

Don’t hesitate to seek out professional urgent care in West Jordan Utah if you do suffer a serious workplace injury. “Walking off” a sprain or a blow to the head can lead to more serious conditions, possibly long-term or even permanent.

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